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Reviewers

Every issue of Civil War Book Review presents reviews by noted historians, critics, and authors, matching some of America's leading writers with books that enhance the public's knowledge or appreciation of the Civil War era. In addition, our pages often include reviews assigned to specialists outside of traditional Civil War fields or to independent scholars.

Reviewers from all issues are listed below in alphabetical order:

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y |

Jennifer Abraham is the director of Louisiana State University's T. Harry Williams Center for Oral History. She holds a master's degree in anthropology and wrote her thesis on plantation archaeology in Natchez, Mississippi.

Don E. Alberts is the retired chief historian for Kirtland AFB in Albuquerque, president of Historical Research Consultants, and is heavily engaged in historical preservation, research, and writing on the Civil War in the Far West. His publications include: General Wesley Merritt: Brandy Station to Manila Bay, Rebels on the Rio Grande: The Journal of A.B. Peticolas, and The Battle of Glorieta: Union Victory in the West. He can be reached via email at Cactus0063@aol.com.

Erik B. Alexander is currently a research fellow with the Department of History at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. His dissertation is entitled “A Revival of the Old Organization”: Northern Democrats and Reconstruction, 1868-1876” (University of Virginia).

Ted Alexander is senior staff historian at Antietam National Battlefield. He has edited four books on the Civil War and written more than 100 articles and book reviews for publications such as Blue and Gray magazine, Civil War Times Illustrated, North and South, and the Washington Times.

Terry Alford is Professor of History at Northern Virginia Community College, a founding board member of the Lincoln Institute, and editor of John Wilkes Booth: A Sister's Memoir by Asia Booth Clarke. He is writing a biography of Booth for Oxford University Press.

Felicity Allen
lives in Auburn, Alabama. The University of Missouri Press is publishing her biography of Jefferson Davis entitled Jefferson Davis, Unconquerable Heart.

Stacy D. Allen is a 20-year veteran of the National Park Service and currently serves as Supervisory (Chief) Park Ranger at Shiloh National Military Park in Tennessee. He has published contributions in five books, authored three issues of Blue & Gray magazine, numerous essays, and book reviews.

Randal Allred is associate professor of English and teaches writing and American literature at Brigham Young University-Hawaii, where he also directs the Honors Program. He has recently published articles on battle reenacting as well as Stephen Crane. He is writing a book on battle reenacting that is due out in 2006, and is working on a book on writing the Civil War in American fiction.

Tyler Anbinder is professor of history and chair of the Department of History at George Washington University. He is the author of Nativism and Slavery: The Northern Know Nothings and the Politics of the 1850s (1992) and Five Points: The Nineteenth-Century New York City Neighborhood That Invented Tap Dance, Stole Elections and Became the World's Most Notorious Slum (2001).

Rod Andrew, Jr. is associate professor of history at Clemson University. His latest book is Wade Hampton: Confederate Warrior to Southern Redeemer (University of North Carolina Press, May 2008).

Paul Christopher Anderson (pcander@clemson.edu) teaches at Clemson University. He is the author of Blood Image: Turner Ashby in the Civil War and the Southern Mind (2002).

William M. Anderson is director of Michigan's Department of History, Arts, and Libraries. He is the author of They Died to Make Men Free: History of the 19th Michigan Infantry (1995) and editor of We are Sherman's Men: The Civil War Letters of Henry Orendoff. (2000)

Rod Andrew, Jr. is an assistant professor of history at Clemson University. He is the author of Long Gray Lines: The Southern Military School Tradition, 1839-1915 (Chapel Hill: UNC Press, 2001).

Dave Arneson first began reenacting in 1976 with the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry. He serves as an associate of the United States Civil War Center, delivers talks at conventions and to Round Tables, plays "way too many" war games, and is an instructor teaching computer game design at Full Sail University in Orlando, Florida.

Paul Ashdown is a professor of journalism at the University of Tennessee. He is the co-author of The Mosby Myth and The Myth of Nathan Bedford Forrest, and is the author of A Cold Mountain Companion.

Ted Atkinson is currently serving in a postdoctoral appointment as instructor of English at Louisiana State University. His recent article on Faulkner's Mosquitoes appeared in the fall issue of The Faulkner Journal.

Grady Atwater is the site curator of the John Brown Museum State Historic Site in Osawatomie, Kansas.

Edward L. Ayers is Hugh P. Kelly Professor of History and Dean of College and Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Virginia. His first book, The Promise of the New South, was a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award finalist.

H. Robert Baker is an assistant professor of history at Georgia State University. He is the author of The Rescue of Joshua Glover: A Fugitive Slave, the Constitution, and the Coming of the Civil War (Ohio University Press, 2006) and is currently working on a book about the Supreme Court case of Prigg v. Pennsylvania.

Jean Harvey Baker is a professor of history at Goucher College. Her books include Mary Todd Lincoln: A Biography (1987), The Stevensons: Biography of an American Family (1996), and the recently coauthored Civil War and Reconstruction (2001).

Erica L. Ball is Assistant Professor of History at Union College. She is currently working on a manuscript examining gender and northern black activism in the decades surrounding the Civil War.

Michael B. Ballard is coordinator of the Congressional and Political Research Center and University Archivist at Mississippi State University.

Diana Barrett is an independent historical researcher and scholar. She can be contacted at dbarrett@triton.net.

Ben L. Bassham, emeritus professor of art at Kent State University, is the author of Conrad Wise Chapman, Artist and Soldier of the Confederacy (1998), for which he recently won the first Henry Timrod Southern Culture Award. He also edited Chapman’s Civil War memoir, Ten Months in the "Orphan Brigade" (1999).

Bonnie Bates is a former editorial assistant at Civil War Book Review.

Christopher Bates is a teaching fellow at the University of California at Los Angeles who has published articles on both journalism during the Civil War and on Civil War reenactment. He can be reached via email at jrhtp@ucla.edu.

Russel H. "Cap" Beatie, a former army lieutenant, is a graduate of Princeton University and Columbia Law School. He has been a trial lawyer in New York City for almost four decades. Beatie's previous book is Road to Manassas (1961).

Terry Beckenbaugh is an assistant professor of Military History at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. His research focuses on Major General Samuel Ryan Curtis and the Civil War in the Trans-Mississippi.

John Beeler is an associate professor at the University of Alabama, specializing in modern British and naval history. He has published British Naval Policy in the Gladstone-Disraeli Era, 1866-80 (1977).

James Gordon Bennett has published two novels, My Father's Geisha (1990) and The Moon Stops Here (1994). His nonfiction has appeared in Vogue, Glamour, and The New York Times Book Review. He teaches at Louisiana State University.

John Benson is a Deputy District Attorney in Bucks County Pennsylvania. He is the past President of the Bucks County Civil War Roundtable and also lectures on the causes of the war. He is currently working on a biography on General Winfield Scott Hancock.

Arthur W. Bergeron Jr. is a reference historian at the U.S. Army Military History Institute, Carlisle Barracks, PA. He is the author, co-author, or editor of nearly a dozen books on the American Civil War.

Paul H. Bergeron is Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Tennessee. He is the author of Antebellum Politics in Tennessee; The Presidency of James K. Polk; Paths of the Past: Tennessee, 1770-1970; and co-author of Tennesseans and Their History and is the editor of Volumes 8-16 of The Papers of Andrew Johnson.

Michael Berheide is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Political Science at Berea College, and he is convinced that the South has already risen again.

L.M. Berkowitz is the webmaster of "Jewish-American History on the Web," an online archive of primary documents relating to the Jewish-American experience in the Civil War.

Michael F. Bishop is executive director of the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission. The commission's web site is www.lincolnbicentennial.gov.

DeAnne Blanton is a military archivist at the National Archives in Washington, D.C.

David W. Blight is Professor of History at Yale University and author of Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory, which won the Bancroft Prize in 2002.

Mary R. Block, Visiting Assistant Professor of history at Valdosta State University in Georgia, is completing a manuscript on rape law in nineteenth-century America.

Edward J. Blum is the winner of the C. Vann Woodward Dissertation Prize given by the Southern Historical Association, author of Reforging the White Republic: Race, Religion, and American Nationalism, and co-editor, with W. Scott Poole, of Vale of Tears: New Essays on Religion and Reconstruction (Mercer University Press, ISBN 0865549877, $25.00 softcover). In 2007, the University of Pennsylvania Press will publish Blum’s W. E. B. Du Bois, American Prophet – the first religious biography of this leading African American intellectual and activist.

Lori Lyn Bogle teaches social and cultural military history at the United States Naval Academy. Her latest book, Strategy for Survival: The U.S. Military's Attempt to Create a Resolute National Will During the Early Cold War, will be published by Texas A&M Press early next year.

Robert Bonner, Associate Professor at Dartmouth College, is the author of Mastering America: Southern Slaveholders and the Crisis of American Nationhood (2009) and is now at work on a new book, titled Master of Lost Causes: Alexander Stephens and the Confederate Legacy.

Angela Boswell (boswela@hsu.edu) is Associate Professor at Henderson State University, the author of Her Act and Deed: Women's Lives in a Rural Southern County, 1837-73 (2001), and the co-editor of Searching for Their Places: Women in the South Across Four Centuries (2003).

D. Michael Bottoms is assistant professor of history at George Mason University.

Frank Edward Bourne is active in the Knoxville Civil War Roundtable and the Kentucky Civil War Round Table.

Charles R. Bowery, Jr. is a United States Army officer and military history instructor at West Point. He is available at charles.bowery@usma.edu.

Arthur L. Bradshaw, Jr., a retired infantry colonel and Civil War historian, works national security issues at the Center for Strategic Leadership, U.S. Army War College.

A former Oxford scholar and Territorial Army officer, Julian Brazier is Member of Parliament for Canterbury.

Myers Brown is the curator of military history at the Atlanta History Center in Georgia. Brown has an M.A. in public history. He may be contacted at mbrown@atlantahistorycenter.com

Thomas J. Brown teaches history at the University of South Carolina. He is the editor of Reconstructions: New Perspectives on the Postbellum United States (Oxford University Press, 2006).

Judkin Browning, assistant professor of history at Appalachian State University, has published “Removing the Mask of Nationality: Unionism, Racism, and Federal Military Occupation in North Carolina, 1862-1865,” in the August 2005 issue of the Journal of Southern History. His book manuscript on the effects of Union military occupation in eastern North Carolina is currently under review by an academic press.

Robert M. Browning Jr. is the Chief Historian of the U.S. Coast Guard. He is the author of three books on the Civil War including: From Cape Charles to Cape Fear: The North Atlantic Blockading Squadron During the Civil War and Success is All that Was Expected: The South Atlantic Blockading Squadron During the Civil War. He is currently working on a book on the Western Gulf Blockading Squadron.

W. Fitzhugh Brundage is the William B. Umstead Professor of History at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and the author of The Southern Past: A Clash of Race and Memory (Belknap Press of Harvard University Press).

George E. Buker, USN (Ret.), is a professor emeritus of history at Jacksonville University. His books and articles on Florida history include Swamp Sailors in the Second Seminole War (1997), Blockaders, Refugees, & Contrabands (1993), and "The Inner Blockade of Florida and the Wildcat Blockade-Runners," in the January 2001 North and South.

Josiah Bunting III serves as superintendent and professor of the humanities at Virginia Military Institute.

Michael A. Burlingame, Sadowski Professor of History at Connecticut College, is author and editor of many Lincoln-related books, including The Inner World of Abraham Lincoln (1994). He currently is writing a multi-volume biography of Lincoln to be published by the Johns Hopkins University Press.

Andrew Burstein is author of Sentimental Democracy: The Evolution of America’s Romantic Self-Image (1999) and The Inner Jefferson: Portrait of a Grieving Optimist (1995).

Orville Vernon Burton is University Distinguished Teacher/Scholar at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and is the author of The Age of Lincoln.

William D. Bushnell, a retired Marine Corps colonel, is a professional book reviewer with more than 1,450 reviews published in thirty magazines and newspapers, and is an instructor at the University of Southern Maine. He lives on an island on the coast of Maine.

Kent Hughes Butts is a geographer and professor of political military strategy at the Center for Strategic Leadership, U.S. Army War College.

Frank J. Byrne is associate professor of history at the State University of New York at Oswego. He is the author of Becoming Bourgeois: Merchant Culture in the Antebellum and Confederate South (2006).

Chris Calkins is the author of numerous works on the Petersburg and Appomattox campaigns. He is a public historian living in the city of Petersburg.

Eric Campbell has worked as a Park Ranger-Historian at Gettysburg National Military Park for over 15 years. His book, "A Grand Terrible Drama": From Gettysburg to Petersburg, The Civil War Letters of Charles Wellington Reed, was published by Fordham University Press in 2000.

Major Dominic J. Caraccilo, DJC8275@aol.com, is an active duty infantry officer in the U.S. Army. He has authored two books: The Ready Brigade of the 82nd Airborne in Desert Storm (1993) and Surviving Bataan and Beyond (1998).

John Carlevale teaches classics at Berea College in central Kentucky.

Peter S. Carmichael is an assistant professor of history at University of North Carolina at Greensboro. He is the author of Lee's Young Artillerist: William R. J. Pegram (1995), and is currently finishing a study of student youth in 1850s Virginia.

Betty Carter is a professor of children's and young adult literature in the School of Library and Information Studies at Texas Woman's University in Denton, Texas.

Floris Barnett Cash teaches at the State University of New York, Stony Brook. An associate professor in the Department of African Studies, her most recent publication is African American Women and Social Action: The Clubwomen and Volunteerism from Jim Crow to the New Deal, 1896-1936 (2001).

Albert Castel, a retired professor of history, is the author of more than ten books about the Civil War, including the prize-winning Decision in the West: The Atlanta Campaign of 1864 (1992) and William Clarke Quantrill: His Life and Times (1962), and co-author of Bloody Bill Anderson: The Short, Savage Life of a Civil War Guerrilla (1998).

Bruce Chadwick lectures on history and film at Rutgers University in New Jersey. He also teaches writing at New Jersey City University. He is the author of The Reel Civil War: Mythmaking in American Film (2001).

Laurie Chambliss is the cookbook editor of Civil War Interactive (http://www.civilwarinteractive.com).

Dr. C. Stuart Chapman is author of Shelby Foote: A Writer's Life.

Mark R. Cheathem is an associate professor at Cumberland University. He is the author of Andrew Jackson, Southerner and co-editor of Of Times and Race: Essays Inspired by John F. Marszalek. He blogs at jacksonianamerica.com.

Michael B. Chesson is professor of history at the University of Massachusetts–Boston. His co-edited, with Leslie J. Roberts, Exile in Richmond: The Confederate Journal of Henri Garidel (2001) won the Museum of the Confederacy’s Founders Award; and he edited J. Franklin Dyer, The Journal of a Civil War Surgeon (2003), and contributed an afterword to C. A. Tripp’s The Intimate World of Abraham Lincoln (2005).

Christopher Childers is a former editor of the Civil War Book Review.

Meg Chorlian is the editor of COBBLESTONE, the American history magazine for children. She has worked on many Civil War-related issues for COBBLESTONE, including an upcoming January 2004 issue on the "Navy in the Civil War."

Mark K. Christ is the community outreach director for the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program, where among his other duties he works to preserve Arkansas's Civil War battlefields. He is the author of Getting Used to Being Shot At: The Spence Family Civil War Letters, editor of Rugged and Sublime: The Civil War in Arkansas and All Cut to Pieces and Gone to Hell: The Civil War, Race Relations and the Battle of Poison Spring, and co-editor with Cathryn H. Slater of Sentinels of History: Reflections on Arkansas Properties Listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Jonathan M. Chu is Associate Dean of the Graduate College of Education and Associate Professor of the Department of History of the University of Massachusetts-Boston. The author of Neighbors, Friends and Madmen: The Puritan Adjustment to Heterodoxy in Seventeenth Century Massachusetts, he has written on public and private debt in post-revolutionary Massachusetts, the legal and economic impact of the Revolution, Chinese Exclusion, and Daniel Webster's drinking.

John Cimprich, professor of history at Thomas More College, has written Slavery’s End in Tennessee, 1861-1865 and Fort Pillow, a Civil War Massacre, and Public Memory.

Margaret L. Clark is a Ph.D. candidate in English at Louisiana State University. Her areas of study include life of common soldiers, home front issues, and social change.

Nancy Clayton, who lives in the Texas Hill Country, is the author of Strange but True Civil War Stories (1999 and Draw History Civil War (1999), both published for children by Lowell House Juvenile. Her current work-in-progress is a complete bibliography of children's Civil War literature, Civil War Books for Children.

Barbara Cloud is a Professor of Journalism Emeritus, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and editor of Minister to the Cherokees: A Civil War Autobiography by James Anderson Slover (University of Nebraska Press, 2001). Her current work in progress includes Western Destiny: The Coming of the Frontier Press, part of the Visions of the American Press series, edited by David Abrahamson as a Medill imprint for the Northwestern University Press.

Bob Collins is president of the Jersey Shore Civil War Roundtable.

Jeffery B. Cook is chair and assistant professor of history at Nyack College. A contributor to the West Virginia Encyclopedia and West Virginia History, he currently is at work on a documentary history of the United States and a biography of Bourbon Democrat Aretas Brooks Fleming.

B. Franklin Cooling is Professor of National Security Studies at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, National Defense University, Washington D.C. Author of numerous works on the Civil War, his latest, Counter Thrust: From the Peninsula to the Antietam was recently published in the University of Nebraska Press series Campaigns of the Civil War. He is currently finishing a trilogy on Civil War Operations, Stabilization, and Reconstruction in Tennessee and Kentucky.

William J. Cooper, Jr. is a Boyd Professor of history at Louisiana State University.

Janet L. Coryell is Professor of History at Western Michigan University, specializing in U.S. women's history, antebellum partisan politics, and Civil War history. She is currently completing a textbook with Nora Faires entitled Women and America: An Integrated History for McGraw-Hill Publications.

Dr. John M. Coski is a historian and Director of Library and Research at The Museum of the Confederacy, in Richmond, Virginia. He is the author of The Confederate Battle Flag: America’s Most Embattled Emblem (2005).

Sam Craghead is the Public Relations Specialist for the Museum of the Confederacy in Richmond, Virginia.

Janet M. Cramer is an assistant professor in the Communication and Journalism Department at the University of New Mexico. She is the author of "Woman as Citizen: Race, Class, and the Discourse of Women's Citizenship, 1894-1905," in Journalism and Mass Communication Monographs (165, March 1998), and two chapters on women and journalism in The Civil War and the Press (Rutgers Transaction Press).

Daniel W. Crofts is the author of Reluctant Confederates: Upper South Unionists in the Secession Crisis (1989), Old Southampton: Politics and Society in a Virginia County, 1834-1869 (1992), and Cobb’s Ordeal: The Diaries of a Virginia Farmer, 1842-1872 (1997). He is completing a manuscript entitled The Public Man Revealed: William Henry Hurlbert and the Coming of the Civil War.

Richard Croker is the author of To Make Men Free, A Novel of the Battle of Antietam (William Morrow/HarperCollins, 2004). The sequel, No Greater Courage, A Novel of the Battle of Fredericksburg is due out in March, 2006 from the same publisher. Croker is an independent documentary filmmaker who lives in Marietta, Georgia.

Cornelius Cronin is a Career Instructor in the English Department at Louisiana State University, where he teaches a course on the literature of modern warfare and writes on literature and film from the Vietnam conflict.

Ian Crowe, a founding director of the Edmund Burke Society of America, is currently the senior editor of The University Bookman and program directorat the Russell Kirk Center, Michigan. He was educated at St. Catherine's College, Oxford, and at the University of Bristol.

Edward R. Crowther is Professor of History at Adams State College in Alamosa, Colorado. He is the author of Southern Evangelicals and the Coming of the Civil War and many articles and reviews.

Michael Kent Curtis teaches at Wake Forest University School of Law. He is the author of No State Shall Abridge: The Fourteenth Amendment and the Bill of Rights, Free Speech: The People’s Darling Privilege, and the law review article “John Bingham and the Story of American Liberty: the Lost Cause Meets the ‘Lost Clause.’”

Jane Dailey is Associate Professor of History at The University of Chicago. Her books include Before Jim Crow: The Politics of Race in Postemancipation Virginia and Jumpin’ Jim Crow: Southern Politics from Civil War to Civil Rights.

Timothy Daiss is a journalist, freelance writer, and author of In the Saddle: Exploits of the 5th Georgia Cavalry During the Civil War (Schiffer Publishing).

Enrico Dal Lago is Lecturer in American History at the National University of Ireland, Galway, and author of the forthcoming Southern Elites: American Slaveholders and Southern Italian Landowners, 1815-1861 (Louisiana State University Press, 2005).

John Daley is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of History at Pittsburg State University in southeastern Kansas.

Arlyn Danielson is collections manager at Newscum in Arlington, Virginia, and an avid student of the social history of the Civil War.

William C. Davis is a past editor of American History Illustrated and Civil War Times Illustrated, and a prolific Civil War author. His latest book, Lincoln's Men, is reviewed in this issue.

Stephen Davis, of Atlanta, is author of Atlanta Will Fall: Sherman, Joe Johnston, and the Yankee Heavy Battalions, published this spring by Scholarly Resources, Inc.

Joseph G. Dawson III is professor of history at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, where he teaches courses on the American Civil War and military history.

Mary A. DeCredico is Professor of History at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD. Her current research is on Confederate Richmond.

Christine Dee is a visiting assistant professor in the history department of the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts. Her Ph.D. dissertation, Land Worth Fighting For: Scioto County, Ohio and Madison County, Alabama During the American Civil War was completed in 2002 at Harvard University under the direction of the late William E. Gienapp. She is currently revising the manuscript for publication.

Jeannine Marie DeLombard is Associate Professor of English at the University of Toronto. The author of Slavery on Trial: Law Abolitionism, and Print Culture (UNC Press, 2007), she is currently completing a book tentatively titled Apprehensions: Reading American Literature in the Shadow of the Gallows.

John E. Deppen received a Master of Arts degree in Civil War studies from American Military Univeristy in August 2000. He is a past president of the Susquehanna Civil War Round Table.

Sue DeVille, a published author and student of Civil War history, serves as director of the Opelousas Museum & Interpretive Center in Opelousas, Louisiana.

Brian Dirck is a professor of history at Anderson University.

Peter J. D'Onofrio, Ph.D. is the president of the Society of Civil War Surgeons, Inc., an international organization dedicated to the study of Civil War era medicine. He received his doctorate in 1998, with a specialization in the American Civil War. Dr. D'Onofrio is the editor of the Society's quarterly publication, The Journal of Civil War Medicine.

Edmund L. Drago is a professor of history at The College of Charleston. His most recent book is Confederate Phoenix: Rebel Children and Their Families in South Carolina (Fordham University Press, 2008).

Kevin Dougherty, is an instructor in the Department of History at The University of Southern Mississippi. He is the author of Civil War Leadership and Mexican War Experience. His Weapons of Mississippi is forthcoming from the University Press of Mississippi.

Mark H. Dunkelman's latest book is Brothers One and All: Esprit de Corps in a Civil War Regiment (Louisiana State University Press, 2004).

Jean Marc Duplantier is a graduate student in the Department of French Studies at Louisiana State University. He recently created a exhibition at LSU's Hill Memorial Library entitled "Creole Echoes: The Franco-phone Music and Literature of Nineteenth Century New Orleans."

Andrew Duppstadt holds a BA and MA in History from the University of North Carolina-Wilmington. He is Assistant Curator of Education for the North Carolina Division of State Historic Sites and serves as an Adjunct Instructor of History at two community colleges.

Thomas Dyja is the author of three novels, Play for a Kingdom, Meet John Trow and The Moon in Our Hands, which will be reprinted in paperback by Carroll & Graf in February 2006.

Sue Eakin, a retired professor of history at Louisiana State University at Alexandria, co-edited Solomon Northrup's Twelve Years a Slave (1968).

Gary T. Edwards is Assistant Professor of History at Arkansas State University. He teaches a variety of courses on the American South and has published articles and essays in Agricultural History, Tennessee Historical Quarterly, and for The University of Tennessee Press.

Jay Dearborn Edwards is Kniffen Professor of Anthropology at Louisiana State University. His publications include editing Plantations by the River, Watercolor Paintings from St. Charles, Parish, Louisiana by Father Joseph M. Paret, 1859 (2001).

David Eicher is the author of The Longest Night: A Military History of the Civil War (2001)and coauthor of Civil War High Commands (2001).

Clifton Ellis is Associate Dean for Academics and Associate Professor of Architectural History in the College of Architecture at Texas Tech University. He is co-editor with Rebecca Ginsburg of Cabin, Quarter, Plantation: Architecture and Landscapes of North American Slavery (Yale, 2010).

Jean Bethke Elshtain is Laura Spelman Rockefeller Professor of Social and Political Ethics at the University of Chicago. She has authored many books, including Democracy on Trial, a New York Times Notable Book for 1995.

Stanley L. Engerman is the John H. Munro Professor of Economics and Professor of History at the University of Rochester. He is co-author with Robert W. Fogel of Time on the Cross (1974) and author of Slavery, Emancipation, and Freedom: Comparative Perspectives (2007).

Stephen D. Engle is professor of history at Florida Atlantic University and author of Struggle for the Heartland (2001). He is currently working on a book-length project involving Lincoln and the Union war governors.

Patience Essah is associate professor of history at Auburn University.

Nicole Etcheson is Alexander M. Bracken Professor of History at Ball State University. She is the author of Bleeding Kansas: Contested Liberty in the Civil War Era (2004) and she is at work on "Unionists, Copperheads, and Exodusters: A Northern Community during the Civil War Era," to be published by the University Press of Kansas.

Paul D. Escott is Reynolds Professor of History at Wake Forest University. His recent books are “What Shall We Do with the Negro?”: Lincoln, White Racism, and Civil War America (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2009) and the forthcoming The Confederacy: The Slaveholders’ Failed Venture (Praeger/ABC-CLIO).

Eric Ethier formerly served as an editor for Civil War Times Illustrated and American History magazine.

William Etter, Ph.D is an Assistant Professor in the School of Humanities and Languages at Irvine Valley College. His article on Alfred Bellard's Civil War memoir will appear in the April 2005 issue of Prose Studies, and he has recently completed a book manuscript entitled "The Good Body": Normalizing Visions in Nineteenth-Century American Culture and Literature.

Don Evans is a newspaper editor and the author of Locust Alley: A Novel of the Civil War (2000).

John E. Fairweather and his family live in South Portland, Maine. He reviews books for several publications, is a writer of short stories, and an access producer with SPC-TV in South Portland.

James O. Farmer, Jr., is the June Rainsford Henderson Professor of Southern and Local History at the University of South Carolina Aiken. He is the author of The Metaphysical Confederacy: James Henley Thornwell and the Synthesis of Southern Values and articles on the woman suffrage campaign and early civil rights movement in South Carolina, and the Civil War reenactment hobby, among others.

Collen H. Fava is a former editor of Civil War Book Review.

Timothy J. Feldhausen is a former naval officer who was once an engineer himself. He has taught history at the U.S. Naval Academy and is now studying law.

Daniel Feller is professor of history and Editor of The Papers of Andrew Jackson at the University of Tennessee. He is the author of The Jacksonian Promise: America, 1815-1840.

Dr. Noel Fisher is the author of War at Every Door: Partisan Politics and Guerrilla Violence in East Tennessee, 1860-1869 and of a forthcoming work on the Civil War in the Great Smoky Mountains region.

Michael W. Fitzgerald, Professor of History at St. Olaf College, is most recently the author of Splendid Failure: Postwar Reconstruction in the American South (Ivan R. Dee, 2007).

Andre M. Fleche is a Ph.D. candidate in history at the University of Virginia studying under Gary W. Gallagher. He is author of the forthcoming article "Shoulder to Shoulder as Comrades Tired: Black and White Union Veterans and Civil War Memory," in Civil War History, and is completing a dissertation on European revolutions and the American Civil War.

Kenneth E. Foote is professor and chair of the Department of Geography at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He writes on American landscape history, memory, and commemoration. His 1997 book Shadowed Ground: America's Landscapes of Violence and Tragedy won the J.B. Jackson Prize of the Association of American Geographies.

Lorien Foote is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Central Arkansas and the author of two books, including The Gentlemen and the Roughs: Manhood, Honor, and Violence in the Union Army.

Estelle Ford-Williamson, who writes in the Atlanta area, is author of Abbeville Farewell: A Novel of Early Atlanta and North Georgia. Her articles and stories have appeared in literary journals, and she is working on a second novel, Rising Fawn.

Gaines M. Foster is T. Harry Williams Professor of History at Louisiana State University and author of Ghosts of the Confederacy: Defeat, the Lost Cause, and the Emergence of the New South, 1865-1913.

John D. Fowler is an Associate Professor of History and the Director of the Center for the Study of the Civil War Era at Kennesaw State University. He is the author of Mountaineers in Gray: The Nineteenth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry Regiment, CSA (University of Tennessee Press, 2004) and The Confederate Experience Reader (Routledge Press, 2007). He is completing a study of Tennessee during the Civil War Era.

Robert H. Fowler, the founder and former editor/publisher of Civil War Times Illustrated, is the author of several widely acclaimed historical novels.

Elizabeth Fox-Genovese taught southern history and literature at Emory University. Her books include Within the Plantation Household: Black and White Women of the Old South. She and Eugene D. Genovese are finishing The Mind of the Master Class, a study of the intellectual and cultural life of the southern slaveholders.

Jason Mann Frawley is a Ph.D. student at Texas Christian University, where he studies under the tutelage of Professor Steven E. Woodworth. He is currently co-editing and co-writing two books with his major professor and working on completing his coursework before writing his dissertation.

Christopher S. Freeman is a former editor of Civil War Book Review.

Frank R. Freemon, M.D., is Professor Emeritus at Vanderbilt University and is the author of Gangrene and Glory.

Derek W. Frisby is an assistant professor at Middle Tennessee State University, editor of the West Tennessee Historical Society Papers, and USMC veteran of Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm. He has published several articles and chapters on the Civil War in Tennessee and continues his work on related projects, including revising his 2004 dissertation, “Homemade Yankees: West Tennessee Civil War Unionists in the Civil War Era,” for publication with the University of Tennessee Press.

Mary Bahr Fritts, author of If Nathan Were Here (2000) and The Memory Box (1995), has written more than 150 stories and articles. She currently is working under a grant to finish a book on Abraham Lincoln.

Meg Galante-DeAngelis teaches at the University of Connecticut. As a social historian, her search for a glimpse at our ancestors as people has led her to study the lives of the soldiers of the Civil War and their families.

Gary W. Gallagher is the John L. Nau III Professor in the History of the American Civil War at the University of Virginia. His books include The Confederate War (1997) and Lee and His Generals in War and Memory (1998).

J. Matthew Gallman is a professor of history at the University of Florida. The author of various publications on the Civil War home front, his most recent book is America's Joan of Arc: The Life of Anna Elizabeth Dickinson (Oxford, 2006). He is currently working on a history of satire and dissent in the North during the Civil War.

Barbara A. Gannon is an Assistant Professor of Military History at the University of Central Florida. Her forthcoming book, The Won Cause: Black and White Comradeship in the Grand Army of the Republic, will be published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2011.

James P. Gannon, a descendent of an Irish immigrant who became a Confederate soldier, is a former newspaper writer and editor, and author of Irish Rebels, Confederate Tigers: A History of the 6th Louisiana Volunteers, 1861-1865 (1998). He lives in Virginia where he owns a bookstore.

Sarah E. Gardner, associate professor of history at Mercer University, is the author of Blood and Irony: Southern White Women’s Narratives of the Civil War, 1861-1937, published by the University of North Carolina Press. She is currently working on a book-length manuscript that examines the politics of southern literature and national book reviews during the first half of the twentieth century.

Nancy Scripture Garrison is a guest lecturer in Women's Studies at Curry College and a contributor to North & South magazine. She is the author of With Courage and Delicacy (1999), an analysis of the U.S. Sanitary Commission and its elite transport nurses during the Peninsula campaign.

Dr. David J. Gerleman is a lecturer in American history at George Mason University, and is active in numerous history organizations in Washington, DC. He is currently completing a book manuscript entitled Mount and Master: The Civil War Cavalry Trooper and His Horse--A Study of Care, Treatment, and Use, 1861-1866.

James Gillispie currently teaches history at Sampson Community College in Clinton, North Carolina. He is the author of Andersonvilles of the North (University of North Texas Press, 2008) and is currently researching Eastern North Carolina in the Civil War. His regimental history of the 18th North Carolina is under contract with McFarland Publishers.

David Gleeson is an associate professor of history and a co-director of the Program in the Carolina Lowcountry and Atlantic World at the College of Charleston. He is currently working on a book on Irish immigrants in the Confederacy and their participation in the Lost Cause.

Currently writing a biography of Jimmy Carter, E. Stanly Godbold is the author of the prize-winning Confederate Colonel and Cherokee Chief: The Life of William Holland Thomas (October 2001).

Timothy S. Good, author of We Saw Lincoln Shot, writes from Springfield Illinois.

Lesley J. Gordon, assistant professor of history at the University of Akron, is the author of General George E. Pickett in Life and Legend (1998) and co-editor of the forthcoming Intimate Strategies: Marriages of the Civil War.

Kathleen Gorman is associate professor of history at Minnesota State University, Mankato.

Warren E. Grabau earned a Master of Science in Geology/Geography from Michigan State University in 1950 and worked in a variety of related fields until 1986, at which time he traded his vocation (science) for his avocation (military history).

Kent Gramm is Program Director for the Seminary Ridge Historical Preservation Foundation in Gettysburg and teaches as Wheaton College (IL). He is the author of Gettysburg: A Meditation on War and Values, November: Lincoln's Elegy at Gettysburg and Somebody's Darling: Essays on the Civil War.

Amy S. Greenberg is Professor of American History and Women’s Studies at Penn State University, is the author of Manifest Manhood and the Antebellum American Empire (2005) and Cause for Alarm: The Volunteer Fire Department in the Nineteenth-Century City (1998). She is currently working on a history of the U.S.-Mexico War with an emphasis on the antiwar movement, to be published by Alfred E. Knopf/Vintage Books.

Ronald J. Grele served for almost 20 years as the director of the Columbia University Oral History Research Office. He is the author of Envelopes of Sound: the Art of Oral History, and editor of Subjectivity and Multiculturalism in Oral History: The International Annual of Oral History (1990).

W. Todd Groce is executive director if the Georgia Historical Society in Savannah. He holds a Ph.D. in history from the University of Tennessee and is the author of Mountain Rebels: East Tennessee Confederates and the Civil War, 1860-1870 (1990).

Winston Groom is the author of 13 books, including Forrest Gump and Shrouds of Glory, a history of the Battle of Nashville. He will have two books published this year: a history of football at the University of Alabama and El Paso, a novel set in northern Mexico in 1915-16.

Dr. Jennifer L. Gross is a professor of American history at Jacksonville State University. Her research and teaching interests include the Civil War and Reconstruction, the American South, Women’s History, and the History of Africa. She is currently working on a book assessing the experience of Confederate widowhood in the postbellum South.

William S. Gross is a retired Army Reserve Colonel and Emergency Management Coordinator for the City of Dallas now working in the private sector. A Registered Professional Engineer in the State of Texas, he has a wide range of experience in the military, engineering design and construction and in disaster response and recovery.

Robert Gudmestad is an assistant professor of history at Colorado State University. The author of A Troublesome Commerce: The Transformation of the Interstate Slave Trade (2003), he is writing a book about steamboats and the growth of the cotton kingdom.

Kevin R. C. Gutzman, J.D., Ph.D., is an associate professor of American history at Western Connecticut State University and the author of Virginia’s American Revolution: From Dominion to Republic, 1776-1840 and, with Thomas E. Woods, Jr., of Who Killed the Constitution? (forthcoming in July 2008).

Kurt Hackemer is a professor of history at the University of South Dakota, where his research focuses on Civil War military and naval affairs. He is currently working on a history of Dakota Territory and its interaction with the external but omnipresent Civil War.

Fiona Halloran is an assistant professor of history at Eastern Kentucky University. Her current project is a biography of Thomas Nast.

Debi Hamlin is a Ph.D. candidate in history at Duke University and assistant to the historian John Hope Franklin. She is co-editor of Allen Parker's Recollections of Slavery Time (forthcoming in 2002), has published several biographical essays, and is currently writing her dissertation.

Stephen L. Hansen is Dean of the Graduate School and Associate Provost for Research at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. His publications have focused primarily upon Illinois during the Civil War Era.

James D. Hardy, Jr. is a professor of history in the Honors College at Louisiana State University and has published several books on both history and literature, including one on baseball.

Michael Hargraves has served for 12 years as a cataloguer in the Department of Photographs at the J. Paul Getty Museum in California.

Judith E. Harper is also the author of Susan B. Anthony: A Biographical Companion (ABC-CLIO, 1998). Her newest book, Women During the Civil War: An Encyclopedia, will be published by Routledge (Taylor and Francis) in October 2003.

Margaret C. Harrison is a reference librarian at the State Library of Louisiana.

Dale F. Harter is the assistant editor of Virginia Cavalcade, the quarterly magazine of Virginia history and culture published by the Library of Virginia.

Alec Hasenson is author of The Golden Arrow (1970) and The History of Dover Harbour (1980). He is editor of Crossfire, the newsletter of the American Civil War Round Table in London.

Herman Hattaway recently published, with LSU art professor A.J. Meek, From Gettysburg to Vicksburg: the First Five Battlefield Parks (2001).

Jeanne T. Heidler is Professor of History at the United States Air Force Academy. Along with David S. Heidler, she is the editor of the five-volume Encyclopedia of the American Civil War. She and David S. Heidler have recently completed a biography of Henry Clay that will be published by Random House later this year.

John Hennessy, author of Return to Bull Run, writes from Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Charles F. Herberger, professor emeritus of Nasson College, is editor of A Yankee at Arms: The Diary of Lieutenant Augustus D. Ayling, 29th Massachusetts Volunteers and author of books and articles on historical topics.

Martin J. Hershock is an Associate Professor of History and Chair of the Department of Social Sciences at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. He is the co-editor of The History of Michigan Law and author of Paradox of Progress: Economic Change, Individual Enterprise, and Political Culture in Michigan, 1837-1873. He is currently co-editing The Essential Lincoln: A Political Encyclopedia and is working on a book-length microhistory of a New Hampshire debtor to be published by Harvard University Press under the title Lord Make Haste to Help Me.

Earl J. Hess is an associate professor of history at Lincoln Memorial University and author of The Union Soldier in Battle: Enduring the Ordeal of Combat.

Wallace Hettle Wallace Hettle is an associate professor of history at the University of Northern Iowa. He is the author of The Peculiar Democracy: Southern Democrats in Peace and Civil War (2001). He currently is working on a study of Stonewall Jackson’s image in American culture.

Formerly a historic site manager, professor of history, and managing editor of North & South, Lawrence Lee Hewitt currently resides in Chicago where, in collaboration with Thomas Schott, he is writing a biography of Admiral David Glasgow Farragut. His previous publications include Port Hudson: Confederate Bastion on the Mississippi (1994).

Thomas Hill received an M.A. in history from Oklahoma State University and is currently working toward an M.F.A. in writing at the University of Memphis where he also teaches.

Wolfgang Hochbruck is American Studies Professor at Braunschweig Technical University in Germany and current chairperson of the CWRT of Germany. He has published articles on the CW in Faulkner and Crane, and his 'Habilitationsschrift' is a cultural history of the memory of the Civil War in literature and film.

James K. Hogue is associate professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. His book, Uncivil War: Five New Orleans Street Battles and the Rise and Fall of Radical Reconstruction, was published by Louisiana State University Press in 2006. It is a study dedicated to analyzing Reconstruction as a military campaign of post-war occupation, insurgency, and counterinsurgency, and America’s first military attempt at what we today recognize as “nation building.”

Brian Holden Reid is Professor of American History and Military Institutions and a Member of the Council of King’s College London. He is the author of many books, including The Origins of the American Civil War (1996), Robert E. Lee: Icon for a Nation (2005) and America’s Civil War, The Operational Battlefield, 1861-1863 (2008).

James G. Hollandsworth, Jr., is associate provost, professor of psychology, and lecturer in history at the University of Southern Mississippi. He has written two books on the Civil War; The Louisiana Native Guards: The Black Military Experience During the Civil War (1995), and Pretense of Glory: The Life of General Nathaniel P. Banks (1998). His latest book, An Absolute Massacre: The New Orleans Race Riot of July 30, 1866, is due out this spring.

Harold Holzer, co-chairman of the U. S. Lincoln Bicentennial Commission, has authored, co-authored, or edited 35 books on Lincoln and the Civil War. His recent prize-winning works include Lincoln at Cooper Union and Lincoln: President-elect.

Tony Horwitz is author of Confederates in the Attic.

Helen Howerton is the contributing editor for Murder: Past Tense, the journal of the Historical Mystery Appreciation Society. She is also chairman of the Convention Committee for the 2003 meeting of Left Coast Crime, an annual gathering of mystery authors and readers.

Wayne Wei-siang Hsieh is an assistant professor of history at the United States Naval Academy, where he teaches American military history. He is the author of West Pointers and the Civil War: The Old Army in War and Peace (2009).

Larry E. Hudson, Jr. is a professor of history at the University of Rochester. He is the author of "To Have and to Hold": Slave Work and Family Life in Antebellum South Carolina (1997), and edited Working Toward Freedom: Slave Society and Domestic Economy in the American South (1994). His current project examines the industrial activities of black Southerners during the Civil War.

Leonne M. Hudson is associate professor of history at Kent State University and the author of The Odyssey of a Southerner: The Life and Times of Gustavus Woodson Smith. He has also published several articles on the Civil War.

Lynn M. Hudson is a member of the history department at California Polytechnic State University. She is the author of a biography of Mary Ellen Pleasant, a black abolitionist and supporter of John Brown, The Making of 'Mammy Pleasant': A Black Entrepreneur in Nineteenth-Century San Francisco (University of Illinois Press, 2003).

Peter A. Huff holds the T. L. James chair in religious studies at Centenary College of Louisiana and is currently a resident scholar at the Collegeville Institute for Ecumenical and Cultural Research in Minnesota. He is author of Allen Tate and the Catholic Revival (Paulist Press, 1996) and What Are They Saying About Fundamentalisms? (Paulist Press, 2008).

James L. Huston has written The Panic of 1857 and the Coming of the Civil War (1987), Securing the Fruits of Labor: The American Concept of Wealth Distribution, 1765-1900 (1998), Calculating the Value of the Union: Slavery, Property Rights and the Economic Origins of the Civil War (2003), and Stephen A. Douglas and the Dilemmas of Democratic Equality (2007). He is currently investigating the economic history of the United States in the nineteenth century and its relationship to the free labor ideology.

M. Thomas Inge is the Robert Emory Blackwell Professor of English and Humanities at Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Virginia, where he teaches and writes about American and Southern culture. His recent books include Conversations with William Faulkner (1999) and the first fully annotated modern edition of Sam Watkins’s memoir, Company Aytch (1999).

John C. Inscoe is University Professor at the University of Georgia. His books include Race, War, and Remembrance in the Appalachian South (forthcoming), and co-edited essay collections on Unionists in the Civil War South and on Confederate nationalism.

John Jakes is an internationally acclaimed historical novelist and author of sixteen consecutive New York Times bestsellers. He has written extensively about the Civil War in Charleston, On Secret Service, The North and South Trilogy, and several volumes of The Kent Family Chronicles.© 2003 by John Jakes. All rights reserved.

Lance Janda is an assistant professor of history at Cameron University in Lawton, Oklahoma. He has written articles for The Journal of Military History, serves as the book review editor for Minerva: Quarterly Report on Women and the Military, and recently published a book entitled Stronger than Custom: West Point and the Admission of Women (2001).

Caroline E. Janney is an assistant professor of history at Purdue University and the author of Burying the Dead but Not the Past: Ladies’ Memorial Associations and the Lost Cause.

Dr. Wilbert Jenkins teaches at Temple University.

Clayton E. Jewett is a visiting assistant professor at Texas Lutheran University and is the author of Texas in the Confederacy: An Experiment in Nation Building, and Rise and Fall of the Confederacy: The Memoir of Senator Williamson S. Oldham, CSA. He is currently working on an analysis of the Provisional Congress of the Confederacy.

Gary D. Joiner is director of the Red River Regional Studies Center at Louisiana State University in Shreveport. He is also an Assistant Professor of History at LSU-S. His publications include One Damn Blunder From Beginning to End: The Red River Campaign of 1864 (Scholarly Resources: 2003). He is the co-author of numerous books, articles, and technical reports in the areas Civil War, naval history, archeology, regional history, and cultural resources.

Carolyn M. Jones is Associate Professor of Religion and in the Institute of African American Studies at the University of Georgia. She writes on Southern women writers and on the intersection of classical and modern literature.

Terry L. Jones is a professor of history at the University of Louisiana at Monroe. He has published several books on the Civil War, including Lee’s Tigers: the Louisiana Infantry in the Army of Northern Virginia (LSU Press, 1987) and The American Civil War (McGraw Hill Higher Education, 2010).

Ervin L. Jordan, Jr., an associate professor and research archivist at the University of Virginia's Special Collections Department, is the author of three books including Black Confederates and Afro-Yankees in Civil War Virginia (University of Virginia Press, 1995). He most recently contributed to Virginia's Civil War (2005), and was a historical advisor for the 2003 motion picture Gods & Generals.

Walter D. Kamphoefner, who teaches immigration history at Texas A&M University, has just finished co-editing a nationwide anthology of German-American Civil War letters, Deutsche im Amerikanischen Biigerkrieg: Brief von Front und Farm (Schoningh: Paderborn, 2002), which is being translated with NEH support for future English publication.

A columnist for the news site LewRockwell.com, Myles Kantor writes from Boynton Beach, Florida.

Anthony E. Kaye, author of Joining Places: Slave Neighborhoods in the Old South (2007), is currently working on a book about the Nat Turner revolt in Southampton County, Virginia.

Robert C. Kenzer is the William Binford Vest Professor of History at the University of Richmond. He is the co-editor with John C. Inscoe of Enemies of the Country: New Perspectives of Unionists in the Civil War South (2001).

Amy J. Kinsel is the author of "American Identity, National Reconciliation, and the Memory of the Civil War," published in Proteus: A Journal of Ideas (Fall 2000), and of the forthcoming book Gettysburg in American Culture, 1863-1938.

Stephen M. Klugewicz is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Alabama. Among his published historical writings is the recent article, "The First Martyrs': The Sixth Massachusetts and the Baltimore Riot of 1861."

Willard Carl Klunder, associate professor of history at Wichita State University, is the author of Lewis Cass and the Politics of Moderation (Kent State University Press, 1996). He contributed a chapter, "Lewis Cass, Stephen Douglas, and Popular Sovereignty: The Demise of Democratic Party Unity," to a festschrift, Politics and Culture of the Civil War Era: Essays in Honor of Robert W. Johannsen (Susquehanna Press, 2006).

Morgan N. Knull, a former editor of Civil War Book Review, teaches philosophy at Northern Virginia Community College.

Lawrence A. Kreiser Jr. received his Ph.D. in history from the University of Alabama during the spring of 2001. His dissertation is entitled "From Volunteers to Veterans: A Social and Military History of the II Corps, Army of the Potomac, 1861-1865."

Robert K. Krick, the author of a dozen Civil War books, has lived on the battlefields around Fredericksburg for 30 years.

Virginia J. Laas is Professor of History at Missouri Southern State University. Relevant publications include Wartime Washington: The Civil War Letters of Elizabeth Blair Lee and coauthor with Dudley Cornish, Lincoln’s Lee: The Life of Rear Admiral Samuel Phillips Lee.

Glenn W. LaFantasie is the author of many articles about Gettysburg and of two forthcoming books: Gettysburg Requiem: The Life of William C. Oates (Oxford University Press) and Twilight at Little Round Top (John Wiley & Sons).

Michael Laff is a Dallas-based freelance writer who is pursuing a master's degree in liberal arts.

John P. Langellier received his Ph.D. in military history from Kansas State University. One of his most recent books, Custer: The Man, The Myth, The Movies (2000), treats film and television representations of this flamboyant former Union cavalry commander, who rode to his death at the Little Bighorn.

Connie Langum is the historian at Wilson's Creek National Battlefield and Midwest coordinator for the American Battlefield Protection Program.

Kate Clifford Larson, Ph.D., is the author of Bound For the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman, Portrait of an American Hero. (Ballantine Books, 2004).

Mark Lause is a Professor of History at the University of Cincinnati, who specializes in social history and social movements of the Civil War period. His most recent books covered the emergence of a tri-racial Union Army on the western frontier and the origins of bohemianism in the same years.

Harry S. Laver is an assistant professor of history at Southeastern Louisiana University. He recently published "Refuge of Manhood: Masculinity and the Militia Experience," in Southern Manhood: Perspectives on Masculinity in the Old South, eds. Craig Thompson Friend and Lorri Glover, University of Georgia Press, 2004.

Susanna Michele Lee is an Assistant Professor in the History Department at North Carolina State University.

Elizabeth D. Leonard is the John J. and Cornelia V. Gibson Professor of History at Colby College and the author of three books on the Civil War era: Yankee Women: Gender Battles in the Civil War (W.W. Norton & Company); All the Daring of the Soldier: Women of the Civil War Armies (Penguin); and Lincoln's Avengers: Justice, Revenge, and Reunion after the Civil War (W.W. Norton & Company). She is currently at work on two different book-length projects: a biography of the Civil War era judge advocate general, Joseph Holt, and a study of the post-1865 U.S. army in the Indian wars.

Wolfgang Lepschy teaches composition and business writing at Louisiana State University. He is currently writing his dissertation in the English Department.

Kevin M. Levin teaches American history and the Civil War at the St. Anne’s – Belfield School in Charlottesville, Virginia. His most recent publication is a study of the demobilization of the Army of Northern Virginia, which will be published in William C. Davis and James I. Robertson, eds., Virginia at War, 1865 (University Press of Kentucky, 2010). He blogs at Civil War Memory: www.cwmemory.com.

Bruce Levine is the James G. Randall Professor of History at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. His books include Half Slave and Half Free: The Roots of Civil War (rev. ed., 2004) and Confederate Emancipation: Southern Plans to Free and Arm Slaves during the Civil War (2005).

Larry G. Ligget is the co-author, with the late Frank J. Welcher, of Coburn’s Brigade: 85th Indiana, 33rd Indiana, 19th Michigan, and 22nd Wisconsin in the Western Civil War (1999). He has devoted 25 years to the study of the Civil War, and is the managing editor of a scholarly journal.

O. James Lighthizer is the president of the Civil War Preservation Trust, an organization devoted to battlefield preservation. A Civil War enthusiast and former Maryland public servant, he taught Civil War History at Anne Arundel Community College.

Edward T. Linenthal is the author of Sacred Ground: Americans and Their Battlefields, and The Unfinished Bombing: Oklahoma City in American Memory.

Tom Linthicum, a journalist for more than 25 years with a longtime interest in the Civil War, has reviewed a number of books on the subject. He is currently director of organization development and employment at the Baltimore Sun.

William (Mac) E. Little works as a State Budget Management Analyst for the State of Louisiana. He holds graduate degrees in law and public administration and currently is pursuing a Ph.D. in public policy at Southern University.

David E. Long is professor of history at East Carolina University. Trained as a lawyer and a historian, he has authored numerous works on Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War era, including The Jewel of Liberty: Abraham Lincoln’s Re-election and the End of Slavery (1994).

Thomas P. Lowry is a retired professor of psychiatry. His latest books are Tarnished Scalpels- The Court-Martials of Fifty Union Surgeons, and Swamp Doctor- A New York Surgeon in the Marshes of Virginia and North Carolina.

Eric Love is Associate Professor of History at the University of Colorado at Boulder and author of Race Over Empire: Racism and U.S. Imperialism, 1865-1900.

David Lucander is a Ph.D. candidate in the W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

John R. Lundberg is the author of The Finishing Stroke: Texans in the 1864 Tennessee Campaign (Abilene: McWhiney Foundation Press, 2002). He holds a B.A. in history from the University of Texas at Austin and is currently an M.A. candidate in American History at Texas Christian University.

James MacDonald is currently working toward his Ph.D. in American history at Louisiana State University.

Founding Director of the United States Civil War Center and founder of the Civil War Book Review, David Madden is most recently the editor, with long introductions, of Thomas Wolfe's Civil War and a reprint of Loss of the Sultana and Reminiscences of Survivors. In a collection of his essays to be published in the fall, Touching the Web of Southern Writers, he makes much of the effect of the war upon Faulkner, Robert Penn Warren, James Agee, Carson McCullers, Katherine Anne Porter, among others. Appearing at the same time will be a collection of essays by several critics and writers about Madden's work called David Madden: A Writer for All Genres. He is on sabbatical finishing two new novels and planning three innovative books about the Civil War. This month, he received the Robert Penn Warren Award for Fiction from the Fellowship of Southern Writers.

John Majewski is associate professor of history at the University of California at Santa Barbara.

Ralph Mann teaches U.S. Social and Civil War history at the University of Colorado, Boulder; his current research concerns war, kin, and subsistence in Appalachian Virginia.

Robert Mann is author of A Grand Delusion: America's Descent into Vietnam (2001) and is chairman of the On-Site Advisory Board of the U.S. Civil War Center.

Stephen E. Maizlish, Associate Professor, The University of Texas at Arlington, is author of The Triumph of Sectionalism, the Transformation of Ohio Politics, 1844-1856 and “Salmon P. Chase: The Roots of Ambition and the Origins of Reform.”

Chandra Manning is Assistant Professor of History at Georgetown University, and is the author of What This Cruel War Was Over: Soldiers, Slavery, and the Civil War.

Aaron W. Marrs is on the editorial staff at the United States Department of State, Office of the Historian. He is currently revising his dissertation on antebellum southern railroads for publication. The views expressed by the author are solely those of the author and are not necessarily the official views of the Office of the Historian, the U.S. Department of State, or the U.S. government.

Anne Marshall is assistant professor of history at Mississippi State University. She is currently revising a manuscript about post-Civil War memory in Kentucky.

Jeffrey D. Marshall is Director of Research Collections at the University of Vermont’s Bailey/Howe Library. He edited A War of the People: Vermont Civil War Letters (1999), and has written several articles and a historical novel, The Inquest (2006).

John F. Marszalek is W.L. Giles Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at Mississippi State University. He is the author or editor of 11 books, including two on William T. Sherman.

James Marten is professor of history at Marquette University and author of Texas Divided: Loyalty and Dissent in the Lone Star State, 1856-1874 and The Children's Civil War (1998). He is director of Children in Urban America Project, an online archive of children's history.

Matthew Mason is assistant professor of history at Brigham Young University.

Robert E. May, Professor of History at Purdue University, is the author of The Southern Dream of a Caribbean Empire, 1854-1861 (1973; paper ed., University Press of Florida, 2002) and Manifest Destiny's Underworld: Filibustering in Antebellum America (University of North Carolina Press, 2002). Many of his publications address the issue of antebellum slavery.

Thomas D. Mays is a faculty member in the Department of History at Humboldt State University in Arcata, California. His previous books include The Saltville Massacre and Let Us Meet in Heaven: The Civil War Letters of James Michael Barr, 5th South Carolina Cavalry. In the fall of 2008, Southern Illinois University Press will release his third book, Cumberland Blood: Champ Ferguson’s Civil War.

Ward M. McAfee, Professor Emeritus at CSU, San Bernardino, is the author of Religion, Race, and Reconstruction: The Public School in the Politics of the 1870s (SUNY Press, 1998) and Citizen Lincoln (Nova Science Publishers, 2004). He also completed and edited Don E. Fehrenbacher's The Slaveholding Republic: An Account of the United States Government's Relations to Slavery (Oxford University Press, 2001).

Henry N. McCarl is Professor Emeritus of Economics and Education, School of Business, The University of Alabama at Birmingham. Dr. McCarl has published articles on the subject of Confederate counterfeit currency in Paper Money Magazine and is a life member of the Society of Paper Money Collectors and the American Numismatic Association.

Russell McClintock is the author of Lincoln and the Decision for War: The Northern Response to Secession (University of North Carolina Press, 2008). He is currently at work on a biography of Stephen A. Douglas. He teaches at St. John’s High School in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts.

Charles W. McCurdy is Professor of History and Law at the University of Virginia. He is the author of The Anti-Rent Era in New York Law and Politics, 1839-1865 (2001).

Charles L. McCollum is a former editorial assistant at Civil War Book Review. He interviewed southern historian William J. Cooper, Jr. in the Winter 2001 issue.

Archie P. McDonald teaches at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, Texas. He directed the East Texas Historical Association from 1971 until 2008 and is the editor of Make Me A Map Of The Valley: The Journal of Stonewall Jackson's Topographer [Jedediah Hotchkiss].

Robert Tracy McKenzie is a professor of history at the University of Washington and is the author of Lincolnites and Rebels: A Divided Town in the American Civil War (2006).

Gordon McKinney is Professor of History and Director of the Appalachian Center at Berea College. He is co-author--with John C. Inscoe--of The Heart of Confederate Appalachia: Western North Carolina and the Civil War (2000) and author of Zeb Vance: North Carolina's Civil War Governor and Gilded Age Political Leader (2004).

Sally G. McMillen is the Mary Reynolds Babcock Professor of History and Department Chair at Davidson College, Davidson, NC.

George McNamara is involved in the work to rehabilitate the name and reputation of Doctor Samuel A. Mudd. He lectures and has written numerous articles on the subject. His writing has also included subjects, for children, related to the Civil War.

Mitchell McNaylor is a writer living in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Karen Rae Mehaffey is a library director at Sacred Heart Major Seminary in Detroit, Michigan. She is currently finishing a manuscript on mourning rituals and the American Civil War.

Brian C. Melton is associate professor of history at Liberty University and the author of Sherman’s Forgotten General: Henry W. Slocum.

Wilbur E. Meneray is assistant dean for Special Collections at Tulane University. He is past president of the Louisiana Historical Association and serves on the board of the Memorial Hall Museum. He has received the Charles L. Dufour Award for contributions to Civil War history from the New Orleans Civil War Roundtable.

Virginia Mescher, a social, domestic and food historian, is a 1972 graduate of Virginia Tech in Home Economics specializing in Housing, Management and Family Development, and primary, secondary, and adult education. She has been involved in living history interpretation since 1988 and specializes in material culture and domestic activities. A frequent contributor to publications associated with the Civil War, she writes a column for her website, and has written a number of books, the titles of which may be found on the her website, under the AModern Books@ link. She owns Vintage Volumes, which publishes books and games related to nineteenth century culture.

Chris Meyers is Associate Professor of History at Valdosta State University and is the editor of The Empire State of the South: Georgia History in Documents and Essays (Mercer University Press, 2008).

Brian Craig Miller, author of the forthcoming John Bell Hood and the Fight for Civil War Memory, is currently an Assistant Professor of History at Emporia State University. He is currently editing the Civil War letters of Private Silas W. Haven of the 27th Iowa and is also working on a manuscript pertaining to the experiences of Civil War amputees.

James David Miller is Associate Professor in the Department of History, Carleton University, Ottawa. He is the author of South by Southwest: Planter Emigration and Identity in the Slave South (2002).

Jon Miller is Associate Professor of English at The University of Akron. A former editor of The Social History of Alcohol Review and The Social History of Alcohol and Drugs, his edition of T.S. Arthur's temperance novel, Ten Nights in a Bar-Room, is available from Copley Publishing.

Randall M. Miller, a Professor of History at Saint Joseph’s University, has written on various aspects of slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. Among his many books, he has forthcoming, co-edited with Paul Cimbala, a collection of essays on the “unfinished” Civil War.

Richard F. Miller is a Fellow of the Massachusetts Historical Society, author of Harvard's Civil War: The History of the Twentieth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry (University Press of New England, Fall, 2005), A Carrier at War: Onboard the U.S.S. Kitty Hawk in the Iraq War, (Brasseys, Summer, 2005) and co-author of The Civil War: The Nantucket Experience (Wesco Publishing, 1994).

William J. Miller is the author of Mapping for Stonewall: The Civil War Service of Jed Hotchkiss and is former editor of Civil War Magazine.

Craig Miner is Garvey Professor of History at Wichita State University.

Scott L. Mingus, Sr. is a scientist and executive in the global papermaking industry based in historic York, Pennsylvania. He has seven Civil War books in print, including his recent The Louisiana Tigers in the Gettysburg Campaign: June-July 1863 (LSU Press, 2009). He is currently writing a fresh biography of Governor-General William “Extra Billy” Smith of Virginia.

Amy Minton is a doctoral candidate in history at the University of Virginia and Adjunct Faculty at George Mason University. She is currently finishing her dissertation, entitled "A Culture of Respectability: Southerners and Social Relations in Richmond, Virginia, 1800-1865."

Mary Niall Mitchell is Associate Professor of History at the University of New Orleans. Her book Raising Freedom’s Child: Black Children and Visions of the Future after Slavery was published by NYU Press in March 2008.

Joe A. Mobley is a former administrator and historian with the North Carolina Office of Archives and History. Currently he is a visiting lecturer at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. His book "War Governor of the South": North Carolina's Zeb Vance in the Confederacy is scheduled for publication by the University Press of Florida in the summer 2005.

Clarence L. Mohr is professor of history at the University of South Alabama. He is a former editor of the Frederick Douglass Papers (Volumes I and II, Yale University Press, 1979 and 1982) and the author of On the Threshold of Freedom: Masters and Slaves in Civil War Georgia (University of Georgia Press, 1986; LSU Press paperback edition, 2001).

Carl Moneyhon teaches at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock and is a specialist in Southern history during the Civil War and Reconstruction eras. Relevant publications include The Impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction on Arkansas, 1850-1874 (1994) and "Disloyalty and Class Consciousness in Southwestern Arkansas, 1862-1865," Arkansas Historical Quarterly (1993).

Michael Montgomery, emeritus professor of English at the University of South Carolina, was consulting editor for language in the Encyclopedia of Southern Culture. He currently is working on a book about the Scottish and Irish roots of American English.

Chattanooga, Tennessee, historian Roy Morris Jr. is the author of Sheridan: The Life and Wars of General Phil Sheridan, Ambrose Bierce: Alone in Bad Company, and The Better Angel: Walt Whitman and the Civil War. His next book, Fraud of the Century: Rutherford B. Hayes, Samuel Tilden, and the Stolen Election of 1876, will be published by Simon & Schuster in February 2003.

Michael Morrison is author of Slavery and the American West: The Eclipse of Manifest Destiny and the Coming of the Civil War (1997). He is currently writing a comprehensive study of how the Mexican American War and the Mexican Cession began the transformation of the two-party Jacksonian system into the sectional politics of the 1850s.

Bob Mrazek is the author of Stonewall's Gold, which won the Michael Shaara Prize as the best Civil War Novel of 1999. His forthcoming novel is called Hooker's Tale.

William H. Mulligan, Jr. is an associate professor of history and director of the Forrest C. Pogue Public History Institute at Murray State University. With Joseph E. Brent he edited "Sacred Ground: Preserving America's Civil War Heritage" in the George Wright Society Forum (1998).

Angela F. Murphy is assistant professor of history at Texas State University in San Marcos. She is the author of “‘It Outlaws Me and I Outlaw It!’: Resistance to the Fugitive Slave Law in Syracuse, New York,” in African Americans in New York Life and History and of “Daniel O’Connell and the ‘American Eagle’ in 1845: Slavery, Diplomacy, Nativism, and the Collapse of America’s First Irish Nationalist Movement,” in the Journal of American Ethic History. She currently is working on a book on the interactions between abolitionists and Irish nationalists in the 1840s.

Barton A. Myers is the Harry Frank Guggenheim Dissertation Fellow and doctoral candidate at the University of Georgia where he is writing a dissertation that examines the intersection of hardcore Unionism, guerrilla violence and military policy statewide in Civil War North Carolina. His first book Executing Daniel Bright: Military Incursion, Racial Conflict and Guerrilla Violence in a Coastal Carolina Community during the Civil War is forthcoming from LSU Press.

Al Neale is Chief of Education and Visitor Services at Pamplin Historical Park and The National Museum of the Civil War Soldier. He is a musician who performs on a variety of period instruments and who specializes in teaching American history by incorporating period music.

Mark E. Neely, Jr., McCabe-Greer Professor of Civil War History at Pennsylvania State University, won a Pulitzer Prize in history for his book, The Fate of Liberty: Abraham Lincoln and Civil Liberties.

Megan Kate Nelson is assistant professor of History at California State University, Fullerton. She is currently working on her second book, Flesh and Stone: Ruins and the Civil War.

Paul David Nelson is professor of history at Berea College, Berea, KY, where he has taught for the past thirty-four years. He is the author of seven books and numerous articles and essays on the America Revolutionary era.

Laura Ng is a former editor of Civil War Book Review.

Kenneth W. Noe is the Draughon Professor of History at Auburn University. His most recent publication is Reluctant Rebels: The Confederates Who Joined the Army After 1861 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2010).

Albert A. Nofi holds a Ph.D. in military history. Currently employed as a defense analyst, he is the author or editor of some 30 books, several of them on the Civil War, and contributes regular columns to North & South and StrategyPage.

Jonathan A. Noyalas is director of the School Outreach Program of the McCormick Civil War Institute at Shenandoah University, and is an interpreter at the Stonewall Jackson Headquarters Museum in Winchester, Virginia.

Stephen Oates taught history at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and is author of The Whirlwind of War, With Malice Toward None: The Life of Abraham Lincoln, A Woman of Valor: Clara Barton and the Civil War, and other works. He currently is writing a new book on Lincoln.

Mr. E. Rory O'Connor holds a Master's degree in History from Louisiana State University and works as a Flag Writer / Public Affairs for Team Submarine, the United States Navy's submarine research, design, acquisition, and maintenance organization.

Tony O'Connor is president of the Northeast Kingdom Civil War Roundtable and the owner of Vermont Civil War Enterprises, which reproduces old books about the American Civil War.

Kristen Tegtmeier Oertel is associate professor of history at Millsaps College and the author of Bleeding Borders: Race, Gender, and Violence in Pre-Civil War Kansas, forthcoming from Louisiana State University Press.

Jill Ogline is associate director of the C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland.

Larry Olpin is Professor Emeritus of English from Central Missouri State University and is at work on an endless manuscript on fiction of the Civil War from 1950 to 2000.

Joel Olson is an assistant professor of political science at Northern Arizona University. His book, The Abolition of White Democracy, has just been published by the University of Minnesota Press.

Victoria E. Ott is an Associate Professor of History at Birmingham-Southern College and is the author of Confederate Daughters: Coming of Age in the Civil War published in 2008 by Southern Illinois University Press.

Mackubin Thomas Owens is professor of strategy and force planning at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, where he also teaches a course on the policy and strategy of the American Civil War.

Robert F. Pace is professor of history at McMurry University in Abilene, Texas.

Beverly Wilson Palmer of Pomona College has edited the correspondence of Charles Sumner, as well as microfilm and book editions of the Thaddeus Stevens Papers (1994,1997,1998) and the Selected Letters of Lucretia Coffin Mott (2002).

Phillip Shaw Paludan was the Naomi Lynn Distinguished Chair of Lincoln Studies at the University of Illinois, Springfield. He authored A Covenant with Death: The Constitution, Law and Equality in the Civil War Era; Victims, A True Story of the Civil War; A People’s Contest: The Union and Civil War; and The Presidency of Abraham Lincoln, for which he won the Lincoln Prize.

T. Michael Parrish is an archivist at the Lyndon B. Johnson Library on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin. He serves also as general editor of the LSU Press series "Conflicting Worlds: New Dimensions of the American Civil War."

Lynn Hudson Parsons is Professor Emeritus of History at the State University of New York, College at Brockport. He is the author of The Birth of Modern Politics, Andrew Jackson, John Quincy Adams, and the Election of 1828, published by Oxford University Press in 2009.

Paul F. Paskoff is associate professor of history at Louisiana State University, where he teaches U.S. economic history. He has just completed a book manuscript on antebellum public policy.

Rodger Payne is the author of The Self and the Scared: Conversion and Autobiography in Early American Protestantism (1998).

James L. Peacock is Kenan Professor of Anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is currently working on a study of relations between religious and cultural groups in Singapore, as a Fulbright New Century Scholar, and during the 2003-04 academic year will be a Fellow at the National Humanities Center in Cary, North Carolina, where he will continue comparative study of the global U.S. South.

William D. Pederson, the American Studies Endowed Chair at Louisiana State University in Shreveport, is the author and editor of many books, most recently The FDR Years (2006), and The Great Presidential Triumvirate at Home and Abroad (2006).

Michael Perman is Professor of History and Research Professor in the Humanities at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the author, most recently, of Pursuit of Unity: A Political History of the American South and co-editor, with Amy Murrell Taylor, of the third edition of Major Problems in the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Geoffrey Perret is the author of 10 books, mainly in the field of military history and biography. He is a contributor to American Heritage and Military History Quarterly. His most recent work is a biography of Dwight D. Eisenhower.

Thomas D. Perry, the Founder of the J.E.B. Stuart Birthplace, is a graduate of Virginia Tech. He is the author of Ascent to Glory: The Genealogy of J. E. B. Stuart and the upcoming Free State of Patrick: Patrick County Virginia in the Civil War.

Allan Peskin is professor emeritus at Cleveland State University and is the author of a biography of James A. Garfield and, more recently, Winfield Scott.

Julie Pfeiffer is an assistant professor at Hollins University, where she teaches children's literature, British literature, and women's studies. She is editor of the journal Children's Literature, published by Yale University Press.

Christopher Phillips is professor of history at The University of Cincinnati. He has authored or edited numerous books, most recently The Union on Trial: The Political Journals of Judge William Barclay Napton, 1829-1883 (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2005). His current project is a study of the Civil War on the middle border and its social and cultural effects on regional identity, to be published by Oxford University Press.

Dale Phillips is a 25-year employee of the National Park Service. He has served at numerous national parks throughout the country and is currently superintendent of the George Rogers Clark National Historical Park in Vincennes, IN.

Michael D. Pierce retired professor of history at Tarleton State University, is the author of The Most Promising Young Officer: A Life of Ranald Slidell Mackenzie.

Matthew Pinsker is a visiting assistant professor of American history at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. He is the author of the forthcoming book, Lincoln's Wartime Retreat (2003).

W. Scott Poole is an assistant professor of history at the College of Charleston. He is the author of Never Surrender: Confederate Memory and Conservatism in the South Carolina Upcountry (University of Georgia Press, 2004) and of the forthcoming South Carolina's Civil War: A Narrative (Mercer, 2005).

David Lee Poremba is a librarian/archivist at the Burton Historical Collection, Detroit Public Library and the author of several pictorial works on City of Detroit history.

Adam Pratt is a Ph.D. candidate in history at Louisiana State University, where he studies the antebellum South.

Benjamin Price is the author of Nursing Fathers: American Colonists' Conception of English Protestant Kingship, 1688-1776 (March 1999). He is currently working on a book on LSU as a military school.

R. Scott Price, a major in the U.S. Army Reserves, is author of Nathaniel Lyon: Harbinger From Kansas (1991) and The Ghosts of Fort Riley (1998). He has just finished a fictional work on Civil War drummer boys entitled The Shattered Drum, and currently has two other books underway.

Gerald J. Prokopowicz is Acting Chair and Associate Professor of History at East Carolina University. He is the author of Did Lincoln Own Slaves? And Other Frequently Asked Questions about Abraham Lincoln (2008).

Joseph Pugh, Lt. Col. US Army (Ret.) is an instructor in the Business Department at Immaculata College in Pennsylvania. His primary interest is collecting Civil War small arms ammunition. He is a member if the Board of Governors of The Company of Military Historians and is a member of several other military history organizations.

June Pulliam teaches courses in Civil War Literature, horror fiction, and Women's and Gender Studies at Louisiana State University. She is also the editor of Necropsy: The Review of Horror Fiction (www.lsu.edu/necrofile).

Sarah J. Purcell teaches history at Grinnell College in Grinnell, Iowa. She is the author of Sealed with Blood: War Sacrifice and Memory in Revolutionary America (2002) and is at work on a book about the politics of public, ceremonial Civil War funerals.

Paul D. H. Quigley, a doctoral candidate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is writing a dissertation on the ideology of southern nationalism, 1848-1865.

George C. Rable George C. Rable is the Charles Summersell Chair in Southern History at the University of Alabama. His book God’s Almost Chosen Peoples: A Religious History of the American Civil War will be published by the University of North Carolina Press in the fall of 2010.

Patrick Rael is Associate Professor of History at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine. He is the author of Black Identity and Black Protest in the Antebellum North (University of North Carolina Press, 2002), and co-editor (with Richard Newman and Phillip Lapsanksy) of Pamphlets of Protest: An Anthology of Early African-American Protest Literature, 1790-1860(Routledge, 2000).

Ethan S. Rafuse is associate professor of military history at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, KS.

James A. Ramage, Regents Professor of History at Northern Kentucky University, is author of Rebel Raider: The Life of General John Hunt Morgan and Gray Ghost: The Life of Col. John Singleton Mosby. He is currently writing a book on the history of Kentucky from 1800 to 1865 with his daughter Andrea Watkins and a biography of Ulysses S. Grant.

Steven J. Ramold is an assistant professor at Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti, Michigan. He is the author of Slaves, Sailors, Citizens: African Americans in the Union Navy (2002) and Baring the Iron Hand: Discipline in the Union Army, which will be published in Fall 2009.

Matthew A. Rarey, who has worked at The Washington Times and USA Today, is recipient of the 2000 Patrick B. McGuigan Op-Ed Award. He currently works for a Chicago investment firm, but given the choice, prefers Gettysburg to Bloomberg.

Jory V. Reedy is the editor of the Civil War Roundtable of Eastern Kansas's newsletter.

Lex Renda is an associate professor of history at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Jane Rhodes is an associate professor if ethnic studies at the University of California, San Diego. She is the author of Mary Ann Shadd Cary: The Black Press and Protest in the Nineteenth Century (Indiana, 1998).

Kym S. Rice is the Assistant Director of the Museum Studies Program at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Her exhibition work focuses on African American history and includes "Before Freedom Came: African American Life in the Antebellum South."

Wesley Allen Riddle is fellow at the National Humanities Institute and author of recent essays on the Whig party in Humanitas.

Ronald D. Rietveld, professor of history at Cal State, Fullerton, has written extensively on Lincoln, the antebellum period, Civil War, and Reconstruction, and the history of religion in America. He is working on a new study of the Lincoln White House community.

Jennifer Ritterhouse is an Assistant Professor of History at Utah State University and is currently completing a monograph titled Learning Race: Racial Etiquette and the Socialization of Children in the Jim Crow South.

James L. Roark, Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of History at Emory University, is working on The Confederate Experience: A Documentary History of Southerners at War.

Giselle Roberts is a Research Associate in American History at La Trobe University in Melbourne, Australia. She is the author of The Confederate Belle (University of Missouri Press, 2003) and the editor of The Correspondence of Sarah Morgan and Francis Warrington Dawson (University of Georgia Press and the Southern Texts Society, 2004).

William H. Roberts is a retired US Navy commander with a Ph.D. in history from Ohio State University. He is the author of Civil War Ironclads: Industrial Mobilization for the Union Navy, USS New Ironsides in the Civil War, and Now for the Contest: Coastal and Oceanic Naval Operations in the Civil War, to be published in Autumn 2004 by the University of Nebraska Press.

James I. Robertson, Jr., is author of Stonewall Jackson: The Man, The Soldier, The Legend and Alumni Distinguished Professor at Virginia Tech.

Stephen Rockenbach is an assistant professor of history at Virginia State University, Petersburg, Virginia.

Glenn Robins, Associate Professor of History at Georgia Southwestern State University, is the author of The Bishop of the Old South: The Ministry and Civil War Legacy of Leonidas Polk (Mercer University Press, 2006).

Michael D. Robinson is a Ph.D. candidate in history at Louisiana State University.

John C. Rodrigue is the Lawrence and Theresa Salameno Endowed Chair in History at Stonehill College. He is the author of Reconstruction in the Cane Fields: From Slavery to Free Labor in Louisiana's Sugar Parishes, 1862-1880 (LSU Press, 2001).

Sylvia Frank Rodrigue runs Sylverlining, LLC, an editorial consulting service, and serves as executive editor for Southern Illinois University Press. She is the coauthor of Historic Baton Rouge: An Illustrated History.

Charles P. Roland is professor of history emeritus at the University of Kentucky.

Julia Rose is a doctoral candidate in the College of Education at Louisiana State University. Her research focuses on the ethics of representations of slave life in Louisiana museums. Rose has been a contributor to the CWBR since 2001.

Charles D. Ross, associate professor of physics at Longwood College in Farmville, Virginia, is author of Trial by Fire: Science, Technology and the Civil War (2000). His second book, dealing with the effects of unusual acoustics on Civil War battles, is due out in spring 2001.

Steve Ross is a journalist for SpecComm International. In 2000 he worked at the Stonewall Jackson House in Lexington, Virginia, as the Edmund N. Snyder Graduate Fellow. He is the author of To Prepare Our Sons for All the Duties that May Lie Before Them: The Hillsborough Military Academy and Military Education in Antebellum North Carolina, North Carolina Historical Review (2002).

Sarah Roth
is an assistant professor of history at Widener University in Chester, Pennsylvania.

Joshua D. Rothman is an assistant professor of history at the University of Alabama. He is the author of Notorious in the Neighborhood: Sex and Families across the Color Line in Virginia, 1787-1861, and is currently working on a study of banditry, gambling, and slave insurrection scares in the Old Southwest.

R. Nichole Rougeau is a doctoral candidate pursuing studies in 19th-century British and children's literature at Louisiana State University.

Anne Sarah Rubin is an assistant professor of history at the University if Maryland, Baltimore County. She is the co-author of Valley of the Shadow: The Eve of War (2000), winner of the e-Lincoln prize.

Hugh Ruppersburg is Senior Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences and Professor of English at the University of Georgia. He writes about American literature and film, especially literature of Georgia and the American South. He is writing a book on films about the American South.

James M. Russell is chair of the history department at the University of Tennessee, Chattanooga. He is the author of Atlanta, 1847-1890: City Building in the Old South and the New.

Jerry L. Russell is chairman of Civil War Round Table Associates, which he founded in 1968. A Little Rock political consultant, he has devoted the past 50 years to the study of Civil War history.

Peggy A. Russo is assistant professor of English at the Mont Alto Campus of Pennsylvania State University. She has published articles in Shakespeare Bulletin, The Southern Literary Journal, Journal of American Culture, and Shakespeare in the Classroom. She is co-editor, with Paul Finkelman, of Terrible Swift Sword: The Legacy of John Brown, Ohio University Press (August 2005).

John M. Sacher is an Assistant Professor and Associate Chair of History at the University of Central Florida. He is author of A Perfect War of Politics: Parties, Politicians, and Democracy in Louisiana, 1824-1861, and he is currently researching a book on Confederate conscription.

Sean Salai, editor of The Wabash Commentary, prepared this review while in residence at the Institute for Political Journalism at Georgetown University.

Maureen Stack Sappéy , who resides in Chestertown, Maryland, with her husband and four children, is the author of Letters from Vinnie, A Rose at Bull Run, Dreams of Julia, Dreams of Ships, and Yankee Spy.

Theodore P. Savas is the publisher and acquisitions editor of Savas Publishing Company and an attorney living in Northern California. He is the author or editor of numerous articles and books.

William K. Scarborough (University of Southern Mississippi) is the author or editor of five books and numerous articles on the Civil War and the plantation South. His latest book, Masters of the Big House (LSU Press, 2003) won the Jules and Frances Landry Award from LSU Press, and he was the recipient in February, 2004, of the Richard Wright Award for Literary Excellence for the entire body of his work.

Frank J. Scaturro, author of President Grant Reconsidered, currently serves as Counsel to the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Matthew G. Schoenbachler is a professor of history at the University of North Alabama.

Jane E. Schultz is Associate Professor of English, American Studies, and Women's Studies at Indiana University-Purdue University-Indianapolis. She recently published Women at the Front: Hospital Workers in Civil War America (Univ. of North Carolina, 2004) and is finishing work on This Birth Place of Souls: Harriet Eaton' s Civil War--an annotated edition of one of the last remaining unpublished Civil War nursing diaries.

Loren Schweninger
is professor of history and director of the Race and Slavery Petitions Project at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Craig R. Scott is a Certified Genealogical Records Specialist who specializes in military records in the National Archives. He is a frequent lecturer on military research methodology at national genealogical conferences.

John Anthony Scott is the editor of the definitive modern edition of Frances Anne Kemble’s Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation in 1838-1839 (1961, reissued 1984) and author of Fanny Kemble’s America (1973).

Ronald R. Seagrave, director of Sergeant Kirkland's Museum and Historical Society, is author of Civil War Books: Confederate & Union, Including Related Titles Ranging from Historical Archeological to Slavery (1995) and Civil War Autographs & Manuscripts (1992).

Richard Sears, Ph.D., Chester D. Tripp Memorial Chair in Humanities at Berea College, is the author of several books on abolitionism and the Civil War in Kentucky, including The Day of Small Things, Kentucky Abolitionists in the Midst of Slavery, A Utopian Experiment in Kentucky, and Camp Nelson, Kentucky: A Civil War History.

Stephen W. Sears is author of Landscape Turned Red: The Battle of Antietam, George B. McClellan: The Young Napoleon, and other noted books.

Philip L. Secrist is associate professor of history at Kennesaw State University and is the author of The Battle of Resaca (1998). His work-in-progress is entitled Tracing General Sherman’s Route from Ringgold to Jonesboro.

John R. Sellers is historical specialist for the Civil War and Reconstruction periods in the Library of Congress manuscript division. His publications include Civil War Manuscripts: A Guide to Collections in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress and Maps and Charts of North America and the West Indies.

Ben H. Severance is an assistant professor of history at Auburn University Montgomery. He is the author of Tennessee’s Radical Army: The State Guard and its Role in Reconstruction, 1867-1869.

William G. Shade is professor of history emeritus at Lehigh University.

Donald R. Shaffer is Assistant Professor of History at Upper Iowa University in Fayette, Iowa. His book, After the Glory: The Struggles of Black Civil War Veterans (University Press of Kansas, 2004) won the Peter Seaborg Award for Civil War Scholarship. He is also the co-author with Elizabeth Regosin of Voices of Emancipation: Understanding Slavery, the Civil War, and Reconstruction through the U.S. Pension Bureau Files (NYU Press, 2008).

Aaron Sheehan-Dean is an associate professor of history at the University of North Florida. He is author of Why Confederates Fought: Family and Nation in Civil War Virginia.

Robert S. Shelton, an associate professor of history at Cleveland State University, has published articles on slavery, race, and labor in the antebellum and postbellum South.

Dana B. Shoaf is the associate editor of America’s Civil War magazine. With Robert G. Carroon, he is co-author of Union Blue: The History of the Military Order of the Loyal Legion of the United States (2000).

Malcolm K. Shuman is a Baton Rouge contract archaeologist and author of 13 mystery novels. Avon Books will release his latest novel, The Last Mayan, in October 2001.

David Silkenat is an Assistant Professor of History and Education at North Dakota State University.

Jason H. Silverman is professor of history at Winthrop University and a former South Carolina Professor of the Year. Author of many works on the Civil War, his latest book is a forthcoming biography of General Nathan "Shanks” Evans.

Donald C. Simmons Jr. serves as executive director of the South Dakota Humanities Council and the South Dakota Center for the Book. A former professor of history, he is the author of Confederate Settlements in British Honduras and co-editor of Latin America and the Caribbean in Transition.

Brooks D. Simpson is ASU Foundation Professor of History at Arizona State University.

Lewis P. Simpson is the author of Mind and the Civil War (1989, reissue 1998) and The Fable of the Southern Writer (1994).

Tiwanna M. Simpson is currently completing her first book manuscript of African life and slavery in early Georgia.

Theresa A. Singleton is an archaeologist at Syracuse University who is editor of The Archaeology of Slavery and Plantation Life (Academic Press, 1985),and I, Too, Am American: Archaeological Studies of African American Life (University Press of Virginia, 1999).

Manisha Sinha is Associate Professor of Afro-American Studies and History at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She is the author of The Counterrevolution of Slavery: Politics and Ideology in Antebellum South Carolina (2000) and co-editor of the two-volume African American Mosaic: A Documentary History from the Slave Trade to the Twenty First Century (2004) and Contested Democracy: Freedom, Race and Power in American History (2007). Currently, she is writing a book on African Americans and the movement to abolish slavery, 1775-1865.

Richard Slotkin is the Olin Professor of American Studies at Weslyan University, where he teaches interdisciplinary courses on American culture linking literature, film, and history. In July he received the 2000 Michael Shaara Award for his novel, Abe (2000).

Andrew L. Slap is an associate professor of history at East Tennessee State University. He is the author of The Doom of Reconstruction: The Liberal Republicans in the Civil War Era (2006) and is currently working on a social history of African-American soldiers in Memphis during the Civil War and Reconstruction.

David Slay is a park ranger at Vicksburg National Military Park and an adjunct professor at Hinds Community College and American Public University System

Edna Jordan Smith served as a history teacher and librarian in the East Baton Rouge Parish School System.

JaNeen M. Smith has been the executive director of the National Museum of Civil War Medicine in Frederick, Maryland, since 1996. She has over 20 years of professional experience in the museum field specializing in American history.

John David Smith is Graduate Alumni Distinguished Professor of History at North Carolina State University. His latest book is Black Judas: William Hannibal Thomas and The American Negro.

Mark A. Smith is an assistant professor of history at Fort Valley State University in central Georgia. He specializes in American history between 1815 and 1860, with a focus on the institutional development of the American military and military policy. He is currently working on a study of the Third System of Coastal Defense and the defense policy on which it was based, tentatively entitled Engineering Security: The Corps of Engineers and Third System Defense Policy, 1815-1861.

Mark M. Smith is Carolina Distinguished Professor of History at the University of South Carolina, Columbia. His most recent book is Sensing the Past: Seeing, Hearing, Smelling, Tasting, and Touching in History, published by the University of California Press.

Michael T. Smith is assistant professor of history at McNeese State University. He is the author of A Traitor and a Scoundrel: Benjamin Hedrick and the Cost of Dissent (University of Delaware Press).

Jeff Smithpeters recently completed his Ph.D. in American Literature at Louisiana State University. His dissertation examines Civil War novels in the social contexts of the authors who wrote them. He has taught writing and literature at LSU, University of Arkansas, Baton Rouge Community College and River Parishes Community College.

Mark A. Snell is director of the George Tyler Moore Center for the study of the Civil War at Shepherd College, in West Virginia. He is consulting editor of Columbiad: A Journal of the War Between the States.

William A. Spedale, author and historian, is a native Baton Rougeon with a lifelong interest in the American Civil War and World War II. Among his publications are The Battle of Baton Rouge, 1862, Where Bugles Called and Rifles Gleamed: Port Hudson Yesterday and Today, and Heroes of Harding Field.

Lonnie Speer is author of the groundbreaking work Portals to Hell, The Military Prisons of the Civil War (Stackpole Books, 1997) and War of Vengeance, Acts of Retaliation Against Civil War POWs (Stackpole Books, 2002). Currently, Speer has two more books in various stages of publication and Portals to Hell is being published in paperback under the Bison imprint by the University of Nebraska, available now in their Fall/Winter 2005 catalog.

Scott L. Stabler is an assistant professor of history at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Michigan. He is currently working on a book on O. O. Howard and has a chapter on the aforementioned in the forthcoming book Soldiers West from the University of Oklahoma.

Rory Stauber is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion at Ohio Northern University.Professor Stauber is particularly interested in the influence of Tolstoyan pacifists on the American peace movement. He lives in Bluffton, Ohio with his wife and daughter, and sails and races every opportunity he can on Lake Erie.

John Stauffer is the author of The Black Hearts of Men: Radical Abolitionists and the Transformation of Race (2002), which won the Frederick Douglass Book Prize and was the Lincoln Prize runner-up. He is Professor of English and the History of American Civilization Program at Harvard University, and is completing a new book, By the Love of Comrades: American Interracial Friendships, History and Myth.

Edward Steers, Jr. is the author of His Name Is Still Mudd and Lincoln: A Pictorial History. He is currently writing an account of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

Mark E. Steiner is a professor of law at South Texas College of Law in Houston, Texas. A former associate editor of the Lincoln Legal Papers, he is the author of An Honest Calling: The Law Practice of Abraham Lincoln (Northern Illinois University Press, 2006).

William N. Still, Jr. is professor of history emeritus and former director of the Program in Maritime History and Underwater Archaeology at East Carolina University. His publications include Confederate Shipbuilding (1969), Iron Afloat: The Story of the Confederate Armorclads (1971), and The Confederate Navy (1997).

Margaret Storey is the author of Loyalty and Loss: Alabama’s Unionists in the Civil War and Reconstruction (2004). Current projects include the edited memoir of a Tennessee Union cavalryman and a study of the federal occupation of Memphis.

Christopher S. Stowe serves as Associate Professor of History at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College in Fort Lee, Virginia. The author of numerous reviews and articles in Civil War and military history, Stowe currently is completing a biography of George Gordon Meade to be published by the Kent State University Press.

Craig L. Symonds is professor of history at the United States Naval Academy and the author of eight books on military and naval history including, most recently, Confederate Admiral: The Life and Wars of Franklin Buchanan (1999).

Marc J. Storch is the author of several articles on the Civil War and a co-author with his wife of an essay in the book Giants in Their Tall Black Hats: Essays in the Iron Brigade (1998). They are currently working on a regimental study of the 2nd Wisconsin Infantry.

Walter Sullivan, novelist and critic, is professor if English emeritus at Vanderbilt University. He is editor of The War the Women Lived (1996). His most recent novel is A Time to Dance (1995).

Bob Summer is Southern correspondent for Publishers Weekly and president of the Southern Book Critics Circle. He lives in Nashville.

Daniel E. Sutherland a professor of history at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, is the author or editor of thirteen books about nineteenth-century U. S. history. His most recent publication is A Savage Conflict: The Decisive Role of Guerrillas in the American Civil War (University of North Carolina Press, 2009).

Wiley Sword is a retired businessman and an award-winning author of various books on American history and historical American weapons. His classic study, Shiloh: Bloody April, will be reissued in a new 2001 edition later this summer.

Craig L. Symonds is professor of history at the United States Naval Academy and the author of eight books on military and naval history including, most recently, Confederate Admiral: The Life and Wars of Franklin Buchanan (1999).

Robert A. Taylor is Associate Professor of History and Chair of the Humanities and Communication Department at the Florida Institute of Technology. His latest book is Florida: An Illustrated History.

Katie L. Theriot, a former editorial assistant at Civil War Book Review, is a copyeditor with Dreamlife.com in Manhattan.

William G. Thomas III, director is the Virginia Center for Digital History at the University of Virginia's Alderman library, is currently co-authoring with Edward L. Ayers an electronic article for the American Historical Review. He, Ayers, and Anne Rubin shared the 2001 eLincoln Prize at Gettysburg college for their Civil War scholarship, The Valley of the Shadow: Two Communities in the American Civil War.

Steven Thompson is a past president of the Twin Cities Civil War Round Table and a former editor of its newsletter.

Susan Thompson, an assistant professor in the mass communication department at the University of Montevallo, is co-author of Fundamentals of Media Effects and Introduction to Media Communication. The Penny Press, a book based on her award-winning dissertation, will be published by Vision Press in 2004.

Robert Tinkler, author of James Hamilton of South Carolina (LSU Press, 2004), is a member of the History Department at California State University, Chico.

Jack Trammell teaches at Randolph-Macon College in Ashland, Virginia and writes for many publications and journals about the Civil War.

Steve Tripp is a professor of history at Grand Valley State University in Michigan. His first book,Yankee Town, Southern City: Race and Class Relations in Civil War Lynchburg, was named an "Outstanding Academic Book" by Choice Magazine . He is currently working on a study of the social history of Virginia immediately after Confederate defeat.

Noah Andre Trudeau is the author of four Civil War books, three concerning the campaigns of 1864-65 and one a combat history of black troops.

Susannah J. Ural is Associate Professor of History at Sam Houston State University. She is the author of The Harp and the Eagle: Irish-American Volunteers in the Union Army, 1861-1865 (NYU Press, 2006) and she is currently writing a socio-military history of John Bell Hood’s Texas Brigade for LSU Press.

Gregory J.W. Urwin is a professor of history and associate director of the Center for the Study of Force and Diplomacy at Temple University. He has written or edited eight books, the latest of which is Black Flag over Dixie: Racial Atrocities and Reprisals in the Civil War.

Gilles Vandal is a professor of history at the University of Sherbrooks. He publishes extensively in 19th-century American history and race. His latest book, Rethinking Southern Violence: Homicide in Post-Civil War Louisiana, 1866-1884, looks at violence is Louisiana during Reconstruction.

Chad Vanderford is an assistant professor of history at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin. He received his Ph.D. from Louisiana State University in 2005.

Frank E. Vandiver was distinguished professor of history at Texas A&M University and author of Mighty Stonewall, Their Tattered Flags, Blood Brothers, and 1001 Things Everyone Should Know About the Civil War.

Caitlin Verboon is a graduate student at Yale University, focusing on post-Emancipation United States history. Her main research interests include the role of migration and urban growth in the emergence of legalized segregation in the American South.

Vernon L. Volpe is chair of the History Department at the University of Nebraska at Kearney. His published works include studies of the antislavery movement and the career of John C. Frémont.

Charles V. Waite is assistant professor of history at The University of Texas-Pan American.

Jon L. Wakelyn, is professor of history at Kent State University. Author of many books, he most recently published Southern Pamphlets on Secession (1996) and Southern Unionist Pamphlets and the Civil War (1999). He is at work on studies of the Confederate leaders who turned against the Confederacy, and on the southern loyalists during the Civil War.

Versalle F. Washington is the Professor of Military Science at the University of Dayton and has taught military history at the United States Military Academy and the United States Army Command and General Staff College. He is the author of Eagles on their Buttons: A Black Infantry Regiment in the Civil War (University of Missouri Press, 1999).

Harry L. Watson is Professor of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and director of its Center for the Study of the American South.

Jennifer L. Weber is a lecturer at Princeton University, where she also received her doctorate. She is currently working on a book about dissent in the North during the Civil War. She has reviewed books for Civil War History, the New-York Journal of American History, the Journal of Southern History, and North and South, among others.

Jeffry D. Wert is the author of Cavalryman of the Lost Cause: A Biography of J. E. B. Stuart.

Robert C. Whisonant is professor of geology at Radford University in Virginia. He has written a number of articles on how the landforms and mineral resources of southwestern Virginia influenced Civil War history in that region and beyond.

Tom G. Wicker was a reporter and columnist for the New York Times from 1960 to 1991. Author of Civil War novel Unto This Hour and 13 other books, he lives in Vermont.

Don Wickman is a Vermont historian and the librarian/archivist of the Woodstock Historical Society in Vermont.

Allen Wier teaches in the writing program at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. His most recent novel is Tehano, published by Southern Methodist University Press in 2006.

Frank J. Williams is Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Rhode Island and is one of the country’s most renowned experts on Abraham Lincoln. He is the author or editor of over thirteen books; he has contributed chapters to several others, and has lectured on the subject throughout the country. Chief Justice Williams is also the founding chair of The Lincoln Forum – an international organization devoted to the study of Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War. He is one of fifteen members of the U.S. Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission, created by Congress to plan and lead the events honoring the 200th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s birth in 2009.

John C. Willis is associate professor of history and director of the Center for Teaching at the University of the South, and author of Forgotten Time: The Yazoo-Mississippi Delta After the Civil War (2000).

Brian Steel Wills, Asbury Professor of History at The University of Virginia’s College at Wise is the author of numerous works relating to the American Civil War, including A Battle From the Start: The Life of Nathan Bedford Forrest, reprinted as The Confederacy’s Greatest Cavalryman: Nathan Bedford Forrest, The War Hits Home: The Civil War in Southeastern Virginia, (Virginia, 2001), and Gone with the Glory: The Civil War in Cinema (Rowman and Littlefield, 2006).

Douglas L. Wilson is co-director of the Lincoln Studies Center at Knox College. He is co-editor, with Rodney O. Davis, of Herndon's Informants and the author of Honor's Voice: The Transformation of Abraham Lincoln.

Shannon Wilson is Head of Special Collections and Archives at Berea College. With Kenneth W. Noe, he was the coeditor of The Civil War in Appalachia: Collected Essays (1997), and more recently, the author of Berea College: An Illustrated History (2006).

Richard Bruce Winders is a historian and curator at The Alamo.

Kenneth Winkle is Chair of the History Department and Sorensen Professor of American History at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He is co-author of the Oxford Atlas of the Civil War.

Lauren F. Winner is a doctoral candidate in history at Columbia University and the books producer at Beliefnet.com. She is co-author, with Randall Balmer, of a study of contemporary American Protestantism, which is forthcoming from Columbia University Press.

Terrence J. Winschel is a Historian at the Vicksburg National Military Park and is author of Triumph & Defeat: The Vicksburg Campaign, vols. 1-2.

Eva Sheppard Wolf is associate professor of History at San Francisco State University and the author of Race and Liberty in the New Nation: Emancipation in Virginia from the Revolution to Nat Turner’s Rebellion (LSU Press, 2006).

Robert Wood is the park manager at Fort Pillow State Historic Park.

David Woodbury is the author of the Library of Congress Civil War Desk Reference, which Simon & Schuster will publish this year. He makes his home in Northern California.

Colin Woodward received his Ph.D. from Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. He is an associate project archivist at the Virginia Historical Society in Richmond.

Steven E. Woodworth is the author of numerous books on the Civil War, including Jefferson Davis and His Generals (1990) and Davis and Lee at War (1995). His forthcoming work, The Religious World of Civil War Soldiers, is scheduled to appear in fall 2001.

John R. Wunder is professor of History and Journalism at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. His most recent books include The Nebraska-Kansas Act of 1854 (University of Nebraska Press, 2008) co-edited with Joann M. Ross and Nebraska Moments (University of Nebraska Press, 2007) co-authored with Susan A. Wunder and Donald R. Hickey.

Fay A. Yarbrough is an Associate Professor of history at the University of Oklahoma and the author of Race and the Cherokee Nation.

Carolyn P. Yoder is the editor of Calkins Creek Books, the U.S. history imprint of Boyds Mills Press, Honesdale, Pennsylvania.

Edwin M. Yoder Jr. is a Washington writer and the author of The Historical Present: Uses and Abuses of the Past and a current memoir, Telling Others What to Think: Recollections of a Pundit.

David Zarefsky is Owen L. Coon Professor of Communication Studies at Northwestern University. He is the author of Lincoln, Douglas, and Slavery: In the Crucible of Public Debate (1990) and several scholarly articles about Lincoln’s rhetoric.

Nancy L. Zens, Ph.D., Associate Professor of History, teaches both Civil War and American Frontier history. Official reviewer for Longman Publishers, for the new Michael Fellman, Lesley Gordon, Daniel Sutherland textbook This Terrible War: The Civil War and Its Aftermath, 2003.

Richard Zuczek is an Associate Professor at the United States Coast Guard Academy. He has authored and edited several works on Reconstruction, most recently the Encyclopedia of the Reconstruction Era (2006).