The History of New Orleans After the Civil War

This guide contains descriptions of manuscript materials on the history of New Orleans since the Civil War. These materials include the records of New Orleans residents, physicians, attorneys, politicians, journalists, writers and authors, educators, students, soldiers, clergymen, planters, merchants, factors and commission brokers, businesses, clubs and organizations. The history of New Orleans since 1866 is documented through papers (personal, business, financial, legal, military and government), educational materials, diaries, correspondence, newspaper clippings, photographs, sheet music, poetry, and bills and receipts.

Some of the topics covered by collections described in this guide include the Spanish-American War, World War II, nursing in peace time and in war, music, theater (opera and plays), literature, and travel descriptions.

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Anne Rice collection, 1979-1991. 0.5 linear ft. Location: W:69. New Orleans, Louisiana author. Articles, interviews, and reviews by and about Anne Rice and her works. Includes audio tapes of interviews of Rice on National Public Radio (undated) and on a Larry King radio broadcast (November 1988). For further information, see online catalog. Mss. 4446.

Referenced in Guides: Women, New Orleans 1866-, Literature

Annual report of the New Orleans Belt and Terminal Co. to the Interstate Commerce Commission of the United States, 1903. 2 v. Location: J:25. The New Orleans Belt and Terminal Company was formed in 1901 to operate the property of the New Orleans and Western Railroad Company. Annual reports to the ICC report the company's history, officers, assets, expenditures, earnings, and traffic and mileage statistics, as well as describe its equipment and relationship to the New Orleans and Western Railroad Company and the New Orleans Terminal Company. For more information, see the online catalog. Mss. 4871.

Referenced in Guides: Transportation, New Orleans 1866-, Business

Anonymous account book (E), 1866-1870. 1 volume. Location: F:1. Record book of an unidentified general merchandise store in New Orleans, Louisiana. For further information, see online catalog. Mss. 312.

Referenced in Guides: New Orleans 1866-, Business

Anonymous dry goods store ledger, circa 1920-1929. 1 volume. Location: N:2. Ledger contains records of customer accounts and lists of purchases from a dry goods store, most likely located in New Orleans. Customers listed include Mrs. Andrew Stewart of Oak Alley Plantation, Mrs. Harry P. Williams (Marguerite Clark Williams), and Mrs. E. A. McIlhenny. Items sold include women and children's clothing, luncheon and bridge sets, bolts of fabric, and napkins. Mss. 5341

Referenced in Guides: Women, New Orleans 1866-, Business

Anonymous letter, 1871. 1 item. Location: Misc:A. New Orleans, Louisiana, minister's wife describes yellow fever situation and church duties. Letter is written on the letterhead of Randolph, Singleton, and Brown, Attorneys at Law. For further information, see online catalog. Mss. 70.

Referenced in Guides: Religion, Women, New Orleans 1866-, Medicine

Anonymous New Orleans letter, 1874 December 15. 1 item. Location: Misc:A. Letter from a visitor to New Orleans describes impressions of the city and comments on violent popular reactions to recent election returns. For further information, see online catalog. Mss. 2997.

Referenced in Guides: New Orleans 1866-

Anonymous New Orleans scrapbook, 1855-1867. 1 volume. Location: H:10. Scrapbook of newspaper clippings, mainly of poems published in New Orleans papers, and sentimental engravings. Items are glued over ledger entries (1855-1857). For further information, see online catalog. Mss. 3012.

Anonymous New Orleans scrapbook, 1861-1936. 2 volumes on 1 microfilm reel. Location: Mss.Mf:A. Miscellaneous newspaper clippings collected mainly from newspapers in New Orleans and Natchez include materials relative to Reconstruction, the impeachment of President Andrew Johnson, the Chicago fire of 1871, and steamboats. For further information, see online catalog. Mss. 2554.

Anonymous Reconstruction letters, 1875. 2 items. Location: Misc:A. Ensign stationed on the U.S. Flagship Worcester in New Orleans describes the chaotic conditions existing in the Louisiana legislature, and mentions orders to disperse the legislature. He also mentions national politics and his own naval experiences. For further information, see online catalog. Mss. 2560.

Referenced in Guides: Politics, New Orleans 1866-

Anonymous traveler's letters, 1882 March 8-13. 2 items. Location: Misc:A. An unidentified traveler writes his son two letters from New Orleans, Louisiana. His March 8, 1882, letter describes his journey by train from Jacksonville, Florida, to New Orleans, complaining of the low state of the countryside and the manners of the poor whites and African-Americans. His March 13, 1882, letter gives a vivid description of New Orleans, including news of levee breaks and flooding on the Mississippi River. Mss. 3858.

Referenced in Guides: New Orleans 1866-, African Americans

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